UPDATED: I Wish I Was A Little Bit Taller

Although I wrote about this almost 6 months ago, I saw another link that I thought I should share. Best wishes to their continued success! (Pagh Salute: Sanaiya’s Dad!)

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sim_bhullar_tanveer_bhullar_reach.jpgThe lyrics once went something like:

I wish I was little bit taller,
I wish I was a baller
I wish I had a girl who looked good
I would call her
I wish I had a rabbit in a hat with a bat
and a ’64 Impala

Dont we wish we were the Bhullar Brothers. The phenoms are listed at 74 and 72. The sophomore Sim and freshman Tanveer (yes, really, sophomore and freshman) from Toronto are rejuvenating interest at the prep school The Kiski School.

After a recent article in Slam Magazines online edition, the duo are generating tremendous publicity and scout and recruiters are paying attention:

Both brothers are already highly ranked, with Tanveer being ranked among the top players in the Class of 2013 by some reports. For their enormous size at young ages, they both already possess an uncanny skill level and understanding of how to play the game. Head coach Daryn Freedman thinks the brothers are a special duo: Their combination of height, strength, great hands and understanding of the game makes their upside unlimited.

Talk of the NBA may be a bit too premature as one still must remember that the brothers still very young. There is a long path to go and they will continue to develop and mature. Still all of us in The Langar Hall will be cheering for our brothers in their progression!

To reminisce with Skeelo, enjoy!

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31 Responses to “UPDATED: I Wish I Was A Little Bit Taller”

  1. Raj Hundal says:

    You do not have to keep observe your Sikh identity to be a Sikh.

    These boys are blessed and we should all be proud of what they are doing. It amazes me how you can pull something negative out of this. They are role models in the fact that they are accomplishing things that few Sikh Punjabi's have ever done.

  2. Raj Hundal says:

    You do not have to keep observe your Sikh identity to be a Sikh.

    These boys are blessed and we should all be proud of what they are doing. It amazes me how you can pull something negative out of this. They are role models in the fact that they are accomplishing things that few Sikh Punjabi's have ever done.

  3. Amit says:

    "Don’t we wish we were the Bhullar Brothers" Why should we wish that? Im fine being 6ft.

    I am not sure being 7 ft 4 makes you a role model. It simply means that they were born with the advantage of height. Now how they will use this advantage, only time will tell. Regardless I hope they do well.

  4. Amit says:

    "Don’t we wish we were the Bhullar Brothers" Why should we wish that? Im fine being 6ft.

    I am not sure being 7 ft 4 makes you a role model. It simply means that they were born with the advantage of height. Now how they will use this advantage, only time will tell. Regardless I hope they do well.

  5. Tajinder says:

    Maybe the brothers could wear t-shits with Khanda's when they play. ;) After all who cares about shababd gurubani, when all that matters is everyone in the community should look like billboard for their religion. Come on Raj don't you know this by now? There is no need to get mad just throw on a t-shirt which openly commercializes Sikhism next time you go out, and separates you from the rest of the crowd of people.

  6. Tajinder says:

    Maybe the brothers could wear t-shits with Khanda's when they play. ;) After all who cares about shababd gurubani, when all that matters is everyone in the community should look like billboard for their religion. Come on Raj don't you know this by now? There is no need to get mad just throw on a t-shirt which openly commercializes Sikhism next time you go out, and separates you from the rest of the crowd of people.

  7. justasikh says:

    JoganVirk ji; I think your post is spot on. It demonstrates demonstrate my belief that it's not what's on someone's head that matters as much as what's in their head that matters.

    Simply wearing a uniform does not make you member of a team, or a Sikh. It seems rather presumptuous to assume the the decision the youngsters parents have decided to make for them about their identity without confirming their familiarity or exposure to your checklists.

    Do you feel Guru Nanak would have ever said these kinds of things to .. kids, or anyone?

    Having worked with over 1500 sikh youth in the past 10 years, I can tell you this much, with absolute certainty.

    Having positive outlets for one's energy is far more productive than letting young folks combine the two worst parts of western and Punjabi culture. Drugs, drinking, violence, self-worth, abuse, all of these things can be avoided, or greatly mitigated by having a positive outlet.

    It is no surprise that one positive outlet can (and does) lead to other more positive outlets, as every soul on this planet drifts inward, onward, and upward.

    Instead of finding faults, try to build on the positives. It's easy to be divisive, it's work to bring people together. I am sure you did not mean to offend just like I have not, but let's try to look at the truth and not stay stuck in opinions and interpretations.

    Bhul chuk maaf,
    justasikh

    " JoganVirk · 4 hours ago
    What does this story have to do with Sikhism (cultural or socio-political)? The Bhullar brothers are hardly role models (or inspiration) for the next generation of Sikh kids, given the fact that they do not observe their Sikh identity."

  8. justasikh says:

    JoganVirk ji; I think your post is spot on. It demonstrates demonstrate my belief that it's not what's on someone's head that matters as much as what's in their head that matters.

    Simply wearing a uniform does not make you member of a team, or a Sikh. It seems rather presumptuous to assume the the decision the youngsters parents have decided to make for them about their identity without confirming their familiarity or exposure to your checklists.

    Do you feel Guru Nanak would have ever said these kinds of things to .. kids, or anyone?

    Having worked with over 1500 sikh youth in the past 10 years, I can tell you this much, with absolute certainty.

    Having positive outlets for one's energy is far more productive than letting young folks combine the two worst parts of western and Punjabi culture. Drugs, drinking, violence, self-worth, abuse, all of these things can be avoided, or greatly mitigated by having a positive outlet.

    It is no surprise that one positive outlet can (and does) lead to other more positive outlets, as every soul on this planet drifts inward, onward, and upward.

    Instead of finding faults, try to build on the positives. It's easy to be divisive, it's work to bring people together. I am sure you did not mean to offend just like I have not, but let's try to look at the truth and not stay stuck in opinions and interpretations.

    Bhul chuk maaf,
    justasikh

    " JoganVirk · 4 hours ago
    What does this story have to do with Sikhism (cultural or socio-political)? The Bhullar brothers are hardly role models (or inspiration) for the next generation of Sikh kids, given the fact that they do not observe their Sikh identity."

  9. Jodha says:

    I don't recall ever using the word 'role-model'. I don't think most 14/15 year old kids could be role-models. They are young and developing. Let us encourage them with kindness, rather than heap scorn on choices, most likely made by their parents. If we can encourage with love, maybe we can become Sikh role-models.

  10. Jodha says:

    I don't recall ever using the word 'role-model'. I don't think most 14/15 year old kids could be role-models. They are young and developing. Let us encourage them with kindness, rather than heap scorn on choices, most likely made by their parents. If we can encourage with love, maybe we can become Sikh role-models.

  11. JoganVirk says:

    What does this story have to do with Sikhism (cultural or socio-political)? The Bhullar brothers are hardly role models (or inspiration) for the next generation of Sikh kids, given the fact that they do not observe their Sikh identity.

  12. JoganVirk says:

    What does this story have to do with Sikhism (cultural or socio-political)? The Bhullar brothers are hardly role models (or inspiration) for the next generation of Sikh kids, given the fact that they do not observe their Sikh identity.

  13. JoganVirk says:

    Justasikh: The Articles of the Sikh faith and our spiritual identity have been bestowed upon us by our Guru Sahibaan, not by my own "checklists".

    Hundal Sahib: Anyone can call themselves a Sikh – even a monkey, but it doesn't automatically make you one.

    Instead of empty rhetoric and re-defining Sikhi according to your own world views, let us reflect on the words of those who have truly experienced the virtues of Naam, Simran, and Sewa:

    "We of the Punjab were called to don the robe of the Guru's Discipleship. We wear turbans as He did; we keep long hair as He kept… We are still alive with the spark he lit in our souls. The torch when lighting another creates its own images. We carry the Gurus face. His features, His whole image, in our faces and form. As I ponder who I am, I know I am of the Guru." (Professor Puran Singh, Spirit Of The Sikh, 1927)

  14. JoganVirk says:

    Justasikh: The Articles of the Sikh faith and our spiritual identity have been bestowed upon us by our Guru Sahibaan, not by my own "checklists".

    Hundal Sahib: Anyone can call themselves a Sikh – even a monkey, but it doesn't automatically make you one.

    Instead of empty rhetoric and re-defining Sikhi according to your own world views, let us reflect on the words of those who have truly experienced the virtues of Naam, Simran, and Sewa:

    "We of the Punjab were called to don the robe of the Guru's Discipleship. We wear turbans as He did; we keep long hair as He kept… We are still alive with the spark he lit in our souls. The torch when lighting another creates its own images. We carry the Gurus face. His features, His whole image, in our faces and form. As I ponder who I am, I know I am of the Guru." (Professor Puran Singh, Spirit Of The Sikh, 1927)

  15. Punjaban says:

    I don't know about all of these arguments about who is a Sikh and who is not. It's pretty sad when ik insaan and simply only a person can judge who is a Sikh or not. Going by the logic that a Sikh must wear all of the outwardly symbols of Sikhism, then Guru Nanak Dev Ji wasn't a "real" Sikh.
    This is the kind of talk that drives away those monay who are on a path towards becoming more aware of their faith.
    I don't know whether these young boys are necessarily role models; however, it is definitely a more positive image than the young Indo-Canadian gangster that the media portrays. Coming out of Vancouver, I'm glad these boys are being highlighted to counteract the images of turbaned Sikhs committing acts of violence (Jimmy & Ron Dosangh, Inderjit Singh Reyat)
    Personally, I think a mona who is pure of heart is a greater Sikh than one who sports the 5Ks only to disrespect them with his actions.

  16. Punjaban says:

    I don't know about all of these arguments about who is a Sikh and who is not. It's pretty sad when ik insaan and simply only a person can judge who is a Sikh or not. Going by the logic that a Sikh must wear all of the outwardly symbols of Sikhism, then Guru Nanak Dev Ji wasn't a "real" Sikh.
    This is the kind of talk that drives away those monay who are on a path towards becoming more aware of their faith.
    I don't know whether these young boys are necessarily role models; however, it is definitely a more positive image than the young Indo-Canadian gangster that the media portrays. Coming out of Vancouver, I'm glad these boys are being highlighted to counteract the images of turbaned Sikhs committing acts of violence (Jimmy & Ron Dosangh, Inderjit Singh Reyat)
    Personally, I think a mona who is pure of heart is a greater Sikh than one who sports the 5Ks only to disrespect them with his actions.

  17. mandeep dhillon says:

    Punjaban, the dastaar and kesh are an integral part of the sikh identity, sorry to break that to you. It's not jovan virk's "logic" as you say, but an identity that started with the philosophy of Dhan Guru Nanak and culminated with Dasam Patshah. People have sacrificed their lives and those of their children so that the Sikh identity would flourish – please do not negate or dismiss these facts. In my opinion, monas are destroying the Sikh faith with their "my heart is pure, even though I reject the articles of my faith" type rhetoric.

  18. mandeep dhillon says:

    Punjaban, the dastaar and kesh are an integral part of the sikh identity, sorry to break that to you. It’s not jovan virk’s “logic” as you say, but an identity that started with the philosophy of Dhan Guru Nanak and culminated with Dasam Patshah. People have sacrificed their lives and those of their children so that the Sikh identity would flourish – please do not negate or dismiss these facts. In my opinion, monas are destroying the Sikh faith with their “my heart is pure, even though I reject the articles of my faith” type rhetoric.

  19. foul shot says:

    Punjaban,

    The thing that’s driving off the monay’s and hopefully people like you, is the fact that you are here today to eat your kudos instead of in some Afghan village, where you probably would have been carted off anytime some invader got the itch.

    If you think its lambee laths or some other genetic qualities that give you heart, than have your legs broken and reset. Many a Sikh in the past has had their hearts broken, families torn to pieces, nation crushed but Soul Intact.

  20. foul shot says:

    Punjaban,

    The thing thats driving off the monays and hopefully people like you, is the fact that you are here today to eat your kudos instead of in some Afghan village, where you probably would have been carted off anytime some invader got the itch.

    If you think its lambee laths or some other genetic qualities that give you heart, than have your legs broken and reset. Many a Sikh in the past has had their hearts broken, families torn to pieces, nation crushed but Soul Intact.

  21. KAUR says:

    VJKK VJKF …

    Im sorry …. i dont usually comment on such blogs or etc etc but this has gotten out of hand, i am used to other kids and basketball players making comments about these two boys and their playing ability but i am out raged at the comments made about their faith and etc etc., i can personally vouch for these to lads and say they do know their religion they do practice sikhi … so what if they didnt keep their hair or tie a dastar… i know many people who have taken their amrit and yet mess about do drugs alcohol commit adultly and so on and so forth ….. these boys are not role models … they are just boys, guru ji has blessed them with such a height and with the power to work hard and better themselves to make a name for their family, themsevles, punjabis/Indians/ Canadian all over the world … so instead of supporting them and guiding them to become closer to sikhi or becoming better at their sport , i dont see why people are dishing out such comments …. its the old Indian curse we cant see one of our own doing well, if we are not doing well ourselves.

    to jogan virk … it is true anyone can call themselves a sikh … including a monkey .. but then again who are we to deiced if that monkey is truly a Sikh or not … it is only up to one.. akal purkh …. so technically what is the diff between you and the monkey ??

    for thoes who support, these boys and to all those who wish them well and then again to all those who would like to look down on, search for faults and hinder these boys from becoming what they can be … i thank you …..

    VJKK VJKF

  22. KAUR says:

    VJKK VJKF …

    Im sorry …. i dont usually comment on such blogs or etc etc but this has gotten out of hand, i am used to other kids and basketball players making comments about these two boys and their playing ability but i am out raged at the comments made about their faith and etc etc., i can personally vouch for these to lads and say they do know their religion they do practice sikhi … so what if they didnt keep their hair or tie a dastar… i know many people who have taken their amrit and yet mess about do drugs alcohol commit adultly and so on and so forth ….. these boys are not role models … they are just boys, guru ji has blessed them with such a height and with the power to work hard and better themselves to make a name for their family, themsevles, punjabis/Indians/ Canadian all over the world … so instead of supporting them and guiding them to become closer to sikhi or becoming better at their sport , i dont see why people are dishing out such comments …. its the old Indian curse we cant see one of our own doing well, if we are not doing well ourselves.

    to jogan virk … it is true anyone can call themselves a sikh … including a monkey .. but then again who are we to deiced if that monkey is truly a Sikh or not … it is only up to one.. akal purkh …. so technically what is the diff between you and the monkey ??

    for thoes who support, these boys and to all those who wish them well and then again to all those who would like to look down on, search for faults and hinder these boys from becoming what they can be … i thank you …..

    VJKK VJKF

  23. iSingh says:

    @ Punjaban – makes sense.
    @ others – a study of aipac etc may provide insight about how to create and defend ethno-religious identity with actions rather than with bells and whistles

  24. iSingh says:

    @ Punjaban – makes sense.
    @ others – a study of aipac etc may provide insight about how to create and defend ethno-religious identity with actions rather than with bells and whistles

  25. Deep Hundal says:

    I've been a part of a summer camp with 650 Panjabi kids where we taught soccer and I can say that the reason we ran the camp was to provide a positive outlet for kids. We had soccer players that played at the national level and elite level and many of the younger kids looked up to them for inspiration.

    These two 7 foot behemoths may not be practising Sikhs and they're certainly not old enough to perhaps even be holding discourse on the issue, but for those youngsters that want to take up sport seriously and see it as an outlet are probably encouraged to see these two making it big.

  26. Deep Hundal says:

    I've been a part of a summer camp with 650 Panjabi kids where we taught soccer and I can say that the reason we ran the camp was to provide a positive outlet for kids. We had soccer players that played at the national level and elite level and many of the younger kids looked up to them for inspiration.

    These two 7 foot behemoths may not be practising Sikhs and they're certainly not old enough to perhaps even be holding discourse on the issue, but for those youngsters that want to take up sport seriously and see it as an outlet are probably encouraged to see these two making it big.

  27. Guest says:

    They are not role models but noteworthy. IT DOES MATTER if you keep the Sikh appearance. Make no mistake, Sikh men are forced and intimidated to remove their saroop in the west. It is a form of subjugation and defeat. I have both kept and removed my Sikh swaroop. I don't understand why so many young men don't keep something that is a source of incredible strength. We should encourage these boys to keep ties with Sikhe. Maybe one day when the veils of society's illusions have been lifted and they can truly see, they will wear the swaroop of a Singh and become mighty human beings.

  28. Guest says:

    They are not role models but noteworthy. IT DOES MATTER if you keep the Sikh appearance. Make no mistake, Sikh men are forced and intimidated to remove their saroop in the west. It is a form of subjugation and defeat. I have both kept and removed my Sikh swaroop. I don't understand why so many young men don't keep something that is a source of incredible strength. We should encourage these boys to keep ties with Sikhe. Maybe one day when the veils of society's illusions have been lifted and they can truly see, they will wear the swaroop of a Singh and become mighty human beings.

  29. kaurasach says:

    I see two Punjabi boys who have made it in Basketball…potentially…This is not about Sikhi…how many of us are real Sikhs? Really? How many?

    2 separate issues….Sikhi and Basketball

  30. kaurasach says:

    I see two Punjabi boys who have made it in Basketball…potentially…This is not about Sikhi…how many of us are real Sikhs? Really? How many?

    2 separate issues….Sikhi and Basketball

  31. […] time ago I wrote an article about how I wish I was a lil bit taller, highlighting the Brother Bhullar Sim and […]

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