Turbans For Non-Sikhs: Just Part Of The School Uniform?

Many of us have taken part in discussions on how the turban is being commodified and a target for hatred. Understandably there is a strong religious argument for why a turban shouldnt become another fashion accessory or replaced with a beanie. This argument is anchored in the Sikh meaning of the turban.

The symbolisms of wearing a turban are many from it being regarded as a symbol of sovereignty, dedication, self-respect, courage and piety but the reason all practicing Sikhs wear the turban is just one – out of love and obedience of the wishes of the founders of their faith.

The turban serves as a mark of commitment to the Sikh Gurus. It distinguishes a Sikh as an instrument of the Guru and decrees accountability for certain spiritual and temporal duties. It is a mark of the Guru and declares that the Sikh wearing a turban is a servant of the Divine Presence.

But what happens to this meaning when the turban is being forced upon non-Sikhs? The Cheema Mandi (near Sangrur), Punjab branch of Akal Academy Buru Sahib is requiring all non-Sikh children to wear a patka or dastaar (i.e. type of turban). Most of these children are practicing Hindus who dont spiritually identify with Sikhi.

As one parents states:

”We are Hindus. We are not supposed to wear turbans. Why are they forcing us? At the time of admission this wasn’t told,” said Gora Lal, parent of a student.

However, Akal Academy Principal Swarnjit Kaur argues:

”We are not forcing them. This was in the dress code of the school and it’s there in the prospectus and based on this we have asked them to wear turbans and there is nothing wrong in doing so.

What do you think? Can a turban be required of non-Sikhs as just part of a school uniform without contradicting its religious meaning?


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46 Responses to “Turbans For Non-Sikhs: Just Part Of The School Uniform?”

  1. sizzle says:

    the large block quote in Jodha's comment captures my sentiment's pretty well.

    to add a tad more, the argument against such a policy is two-fold. first, forcing others, who don't believe, to adopt the most conspicuous symbol of sikhi denigrates it's symolism and value. second, sikhs fought and died to protect the rights of hindus to practice their beliefs. to suddenly discount those beliefs by stating "you're coming to a sikh school, follow sikh values" is sheer hypocrisy to those underlying values and to the values international sikhs have fought for. case in point – the girl in england who wanted to wear a kara to a catholic school or sikhs in france who wish to wear a kara and a dastaar/patka. i hate to quote mohatama gandhi, but, "be the change you wish to see in the world."

    most simply – how can we, as sikhs, ask for tolerance, acceptance and accomodation when we, at a sikh school, demand that others conform to our beliefs?

  2. JASWANT BAWA says:

    I , personally, think, the turban should not be forced for Non-Sikhs to wear. If that Academy has a dress code, then it is OK because in many other public institutions, there is a dress code and no body argues with that, then why are these Hindu complaining about it. To me , these Hindus should find other educational schools.

  3. JASWANT BAWA says:

    I , personally, think, the turban should not be forced for Non-Sikhs to wear. If that Academy has a dress code, then it is OK because in many other public institutions, there is a dress code and no body argues with that, then why are these Hindu complaining about it. To me , these Hindus should find other educational schools.

  4. Jodha says:

    When this story first came out over two weeks ago, opposition camps quickly formed.

    1) One side has largely moved that:

    This is a private religious school and they have the right to enforce their dress code 'within reason' (to use a phrase by one internet commenter).

    This argument is largely around the legality of the course of action.

    2) Others have argued from the 'religious' implications of forcing non-Sikhs to wear a turban and they have mainly condemned the school's actions based on these grounds. Thus a school should be allowed to enforce a dress code, if they desire, but many have questioned this particular policy and its implications.

    This has sort of the 'internet consensus' that has formed in the past two weeks.

    Surprising to some, but not to those that go beyond labels, the group most vociferous against the policy is the supposedly 'radical' Dal Khalsa. Another voice against the policy is one of the Sikhs' leading intellectuals in Punjab, Ludhiana-based, Jagmohan Singh Tony. He has labeled the move a sort of 'minority fundamentalism.' He has published an open letter to the Baba that created the Akaal Foundation and head of the schools. A brief portion of what he wrote includes:

    Majority fundamentalism breeds minority fundamentalism and while working for the rights of Sikhs and other minorities, you should always bear that in mind.

    When Guru Tegh Bahadur said that the “martyrdom of a great person” was needed save the right to religion of the people of Kashmir, Gobind Rai, the 10-year old son of the ninth master had boldly but politely mentioned, that it would have to be him for “who else would be a more religious and dedicated person that the master himself.” Protection of the right to religion of members of another faith was considered more sacrosanct than the right to life of a father. Such is the core substance of Sikhism.

    An anonymous writer on a blog discussing this issue has put it pertinently. He says, “We as Sikhs have to ask ourselves whether we want to turn into the very thing we fight. Perhaps we need those T-shirts like the Christians have: "What would Guru Sahib do"? Guru Sahib never forced anyone to become Sikhs…they were drawn to it because of the beauty of it. They willingly gave their heads. When they bowed their heads in front of the Guru in the position of the supreme beggar, Guru Sahib placed the crown we call Dastaar on their heads and told them to rise…to look as Kings and Queens, but to embody that lowly beggar on the inside. We must ask ourselves, are we any less than the Mughals if we employ these forceful tactics? The Mughals used to forcefully take off people's Dastaars (for they were the only ones "fit" to wear them according to their logic and political persuasion). Would we be any less to force someone to put one on? Please ponder on this.

  5. Jodha says:

    When this story first came out over two weeks ago, opposition camps quickly formed.

    1) One side has largely moved that:

    This is a private religious school and they have the right to enforce their dress code ‘within reason‘ (to use a phrase by one internet commenter).

    This argument is largely around the legality of the course of action.

    2) Others have argued from the ‘religious’ implications of forcing non-Sikhs to wear a turban and they have mainly condemned the school’s actions based on these grounds. Thus a school should be allowed to enforce a dress code, if they desire, but many have questioned this particular policy and its implications.

    This has sort of the ‘internet consensus’ that has formed in the past two weeks.

    Surprising to some, but not to those that go beyond labels, the group most vociferous against the policy is the supposedly ‘radical’ Dal Khalsa. Another voice against the policy is one of the Sikhs’ leading intellectuals in Punjab, Ludhiana-based, Jagmohan Singh Tony. He has labeled the move a sort of ‘minority fundamentalism.’ He has published an open letter to the Baba that created the Akaal Foundation and head of the schools. A brief portion of what he wrote includes:

    Majority fundamentalism breeds minority fundamentalism and while working for the rights of Sikhs and other minorities, you should always bear that in mind.

    When Guru Tegh Bahadur said that the martyrdom of a great person was needed save the right to religion of the people of Kashmir, Gobind Rai, the 10-year old son of the ninth master had boldly but politely mentioned, that it would have to be him for who else would be a more religious and dedicated person that the master himself. Protection of the right to religion of members of another faith was considered more sacrosanct than the right to life of a father. Such is the core substance of Sikhism.

    An anonymous writer on a blog discussing this issue has put it pertinently. He says, We as Sikhs have to ask ourselves whether we want to turn into the very thing we fight. Perhaps we need those T-shirts like the Christians have: “What would Guru Sahib do”? Guru Sahib never forced anyone to become Sikhs…they were drawn to it because of the beauty of it. They willingly gave their heads. When they bowed their heads in front of the Guru in the position of the supreme beggar, Guru Sahib placed the crown we call Dastaar on their heads and told them to rise…to look as Kings and Queens, but to embody that lowly beggar on the inside. We must ask ourselves, are we any less than the Mughals if we employ these forceful tactics? The Mughals used to forcefully take off people’s Dastaars (for they were the only ones “fit” to wear them according to their logic and political persuasion). Would we be any less to force someone to put one on? Please ponder on this.

  6. Phulkari says:

    Sizzle,

    Could you please tell us why no?

    Jaswant Bawa,

    You write:

    I , personally, think, the turban should not be forced for Non-Sikhs to wear. If that Academy has a dress code, then it is OK because in many other public institutions, there is a dress code and no body argues with that, then why are these Hindu complaining about it.

    I ask, why don't you personally agree with forcing Non-Sikhs to wear a turban? I am wondering is it the meaning of the turban itself, just the act of forcing someone to do something, and/or another reason(s)?

    Yes, I agree the Hindu parents can find another educational institution if they don't agree with the rules of the Akal Academy. However, that does not answer if the Akal Academy's enforcement of the turban for Non-Sikhs is justified from a Sikhi perspective.

    Lastly, after reading about this news a couple of weeks ago on other blogs and news sites, they were questioning if the Akal Academy's act was justified from a religious perspective. However, for myself I felt as though there needed to be a more focused discussion about how the Sikh turban specifically fits into this religious perspective, which is why I wrote this post. I wonder why the turban and not a karaa? And how is the specific meaning of the turban affected by the Akal Academy’s action? Does this impact on the religious meaning of the turban help us conclude if their action is justified or not? The issue is not about the Akal Academy’s right to have a dress code or Hindu children just finding another school … we know they can do that. The contention is if the turban can be a part of a uniform for Non-Sikhs devoid of its religious significance or is there a stronger symbolic meaning that overrides the "it's just school-mandated 'uniform'" argument?

  7. sundeep says:

    It's a dress code that in no way violates the Hindu students freedom of religion. Turbans were commonly worn by Hindus and actually all Punjabis not too long ago. There is nothing wrong with it, so long as they were told before they enrolled. It is not solely a symbol of the sikh faith. If they were forced to wear karas it would be another matter entirely.

    There's no denigration of Hindu belief whatsoever.

  8. sizzle says:

    what? it's a sikh school. administrators aren't taking the 1000 year old historical aspects the turban into account. they're implying the sikh belief in the turban by making it mandatory wear. it's equally an aspect of forcing a non-beleiver to wear a religious symbol of another faith as it is to denigrate the SIKH FAITH by making a non-believer wear your symbol.

    just, for a moment, imagine sikh women being forced to wear a chunni or hijab to a muslim school. sikh women historically covered their heads. so what? it's still a matter of choice, and forcing them under the context or pretense of coming to a muslim school is to force ones beliefs. that may be a-ok with muslims since they tend to proselytize, but that's definitely not cool with the foundations and history of sikhi.

  9. Phulkari says:

    Sizzle,

    Could you please tell us why no?

    Jaswant Bawa,

    You write:

    I , personally, think, the turban should not be forced for Non-Sikhs to wear. If that Academy has a dress code, then it is OK because in many other public institutions, there is a dress code and no body argues with that, then why are these Hindu complaining about it.

    I ask, why don’t you personally agree with forcing Non-Sikhs to wear a turban? I am wondering is it the meaning of the turban itself, just the act of forcing someone to do something, and/or another reason(s)?

    Yes, I agree the Hindu parents can find another educational institution if they don’t agree with the rules of the Akal Academy. However, that does not answer if the Akal Academy’s enforcement of the turban for Non-Sikhs is justified from a Sikhi perspective.

    Lastly, after reading about this news a couple of weeks ago on other blogs and news sites, they were questioning if the Akal Academy’s act was justified from a religious perspective. However, for myself I felt as though there needed to be a more focused discussion about how the Sikh turban specifically fits into this religious perspective, which is why I wrote this post. I wonder why the turban and not a karaa? And how is the specific meaning of the turban affected by the Akal Academys action? Does this impact on the religious meaning of the turban help us conclude if their action is justified or not? The issue is not about the Akal Academys right to have a dress code or Hindu children just finding another school we know they can do that. The contention is if the turban can be a part of a uniform for Non-Sikhs devoid of its religious significance or is there a stronger symbolic meaning that overrides the “it’s just school-mandated ‘uniform'” argument?

  10. sizzle says:

    the large block quote in Jodha’s comment captures my sentiment’s pretty well.

    to add a tad more, the argument against such a policy is two-fold. first, forcing others, who don’t believe, to adopt the most conspicuous symbol of sikhi denigrates it’s symolism and value. second, sikhs fought and died to protect the rights of hindus to practice their beliefs. to suddenly discount those beliefs by stating “you’re coming to a sikh school, follow sikh values” is sheer hypocrisy to those underlying values and to the values international sikhs have fought for. case in point – the girl in england who wanted to wear a kara to a catholic school or sikhs in france who wish to wear a kara and a dastaar/patka. i hate to quote mohatama gandhi, but, “be the change you wish to see in the world.”

    most simply – how can we, as sikhs, ask for tolerance, acceptance and accomodation when we, at a sikh school, demand that others conform to our beliefs?

  11. sundeep says:

    It’s a dress code that in no way violates the Hindu students freedom of religion. Turbans were commonly worn by Hindus and actually all Punjabis not too long ago. There is nothing wrong with it, so long as they were told before they enrolled. It is not solely a symbol of the sikh faith. If they were forced to wear karas it would be another matter entirely.

    There’s no denigration of Hindu belief whatsoever.

  12. sizzle says:

    what? it’s a sikh school. administrators aren’t taking the 1000 year old historical aspects the turban into account. they’re implying the sikh belief in the turban by making it mandatory wear. it’s equally an aspect of forcing a non-beleiver to wear a religious symbol of another faith as it is to denigrate the SIKH FAITH by making a non-believer wear your symbol.

    just, for a moment, imagine sikh women being forced to wear a chunni or hijab to a muslim school. sikh women historically covered their heads. so what? it’s still a matter of choice, and forcing them under the context or pretense of coming to a muslim school is to force ones beliefs. that may be a-ok with muslims since they tend to proselytize, but that’s definitely not cool with the foundations and history of sikhi.

  13. T Singh says:

    CLARIFICATION STATEMENT BY

    THE KALGIDHAR TRUST-BARU SAHIB

    Made by Major General R.S.Chhatwal Retd.

    (Official spokesman of The Kalgidhar Trust, managing Akal Academies):

    The issue of forcing Hindu students to wear dastar / turbans by Akal Academy has been totally misunderstood & misrepresented with a view to make it look communal.

    We wish to clarify the following:

    1. Wearing of turban is a symbol of Indian pride, honour, tradition, simplicity & modesty. Sikhs wear turban on account of this and many Hindus also wear turbans. For example: Indian leaders like Swami Vivekananda, Lala Lajpat Rai, S. Radhakrishnan (Ex. President of India), Dr. C.V.Raman (Noble Laureate) and Rani Jhansi etc wore turbans. It is a common folklore that says " Pagri di laaj" i.e. 'honour of the turban'. We do not enforce sikh doctrines upon any non-sikh.

    The wearing of uniform in school brings a sense of equality & upholds discipline values. There are no distinctions between students of different religions, castes & even between boys & girls ( to reduce sexual attraction and bad thoughts). Not a single instance of any teenage harassment of any sort has been reported in any of our schools. This helps to keep students away from distraction & focuses their energies in positive directions and more concentration on studies. That is why rural Akal Academies are producing excellent results outperforming schools from urban areas.

    3. Vested interests are trying to make communal issue of a simple implementation of dress regulation of the school. We should negate such nefarious designs of misguided and mischievous elements.

    We stand by the principles of simple living and high thinking and imparting value-based education, which have led to us producing not only best academic results but also all around development of the children

  14. Harinder says:

    I dont think there is any SIKH in this world who has been forced into SIKHI.

    We are all SIKHS by our free will and I see no reason why this practise should now change.

    If Hindu students dont want to wear turban then let us respect there choice.

    For a true Sikh sees the "ONENESS OF WHOLE MANKIND" irrepective of which GOD one worships.

    For we all know he is the same GOD who love us all his children.

  15. T Singh says:

    CLARIFICATION STATEMENT BY
    THE KALGIDHAR TRUST-BARU SAHIB
    Made by Major General R.S.Chhatwal Retd.

    (Official spokesman of The Kalgidhar Trust, managing Akal Academies):

    The issue of forcing Hindu students to wear dastar / turbans by Akal Academy has been totally misunderstood & misrepresented with a view to make it look communal.

    We wish to clarify the following:

    1. Wearing of turban is a symbol of Indian pride, honour, tradition, simplicity & modesty. Sikhs wear turban on account of this and many Hindus also wear turbans. For example: Indian leaders like Swami Vivekananda, Lala Lajpat Rai, S. Radhakrishnan (Ex. President of India), Dr. C.V.Raman (Noble Laureate) and Rani Jhansi etc wore turbans. It is a common folklore that says ” Pagri di laaj” i.e. ‘honour of the turban’. We do not enforce sikh doctrines upon any non-sikh.

    The wearing of uniform in school brings a sense of equality & upholds discipline values. There are no distinctions between students of different religions, castes & even between boys & girls ( to reduce sexual attraction and bad thoughts). Not a single instance of any teenage harassment of any sort has been reported in any of our schools. This helps to keep students away from distraction & focuses their energies in positive directions and more concentration on studies. That is why rural Akal Academies are producing excellent results outperforming schools from urban areas.

    3. Vested interests are trying to make communal issue of a simple implementation of dress regulation of the school. We should negate such nefarious designs of misguided and mischievous elements.

    We stand by the principles of simple living and high thinking and imparting value-based education, which have led to us producing not only best academic results but also all around development of the children

  16. Harinder says:

    I dont think there is any SIKH in this world who has been forced into SIKHI.
    We are all SIKHS by our free will and I see no reason why this practise should now change.
    If Hindu students dont want to wear turban then let us respect there choice.
    For a true Sikh sees the “ONENESS OF WHOLE MANKIND” irrepective of which GOD one worships.

    For we all know he is the same GOD who love us all his children.

  17. sundeep says:

    one thing which I feel people are missing (or ignoring in their haste to be politically correct) is that the turban has been worn by people of all religions in punjab. IF they forced people to keep a kara it would be another issue entirely. If they do that, I'll buy the argument that they are forcing relgion onto Hindu students.

  18. sundeep says:

    one thing which I feel people are missing (or ignoring in their haste to be politically correct) is that the turban has been worn by people of all religions in punjab. IF they forced people to keep a kara it would be another issue entirely. If they do that, I’ll buy the argument that they are forcing relgion onto Hindu students.

  19. Harinder says:

    Free will of a man is his inalinable right granted by our "GURUS" under soverignity to the whole mankind.

    No where in our Living Guru " Sri Guru Granth Sahib " is the need of wearing a turban mentioned.

    We seem to be blindly following the "TALIBAN MODEL" of Afghanistan.

  20. Harinder says:

    Free will of a man is his inalinable right granted by our “GURUS” under soverignity to the whole mankind.
    No where in our Living Guru ” Sri Guru Granth Sahib ” is the need of wearing a turban mentioned.
    We seem to be blindly following the “TALIBAN MODEL” of Afghanistan.

  21. Camille says:

    Ok, so there are two issues at play, it seems:

    1. As a religious school, should there be a uniform requirement?

    2. Does such a requirement contradict the spirit of Sikhi?

    While the turban/dastar have explicitly religious significance for Sikhs, they are also secular. That said, I don't think it's appropriate for the school to require everyone to wear it. Does that "water down" the religious meaning and significance? This is different, in my opinion, than when a non-Catholic attends Catholic school, for example. While there is certainly a uniform, and you may have to take Bible study courses as part of the "religious" core of the school, it is not appropriate to require this in the uniform. The school cannot argue on one hand that it is religious and thus requires a uniform and then say that the turban has a long secular history, so this shouldn't pose a burden.

    Sikhi is fundamentally a faith that remains open to the religious diversity and freedom of practice of other faith groups. I don't see how this policy embraces the conceptual teachings or physical manifestations of the faith.

  22. Camille says:

    Ok, so there are two issues at play, it seems:
    1. As a religious school, should there be a uniform requirement?
    2. Does such a requirement contradict the spirit of Sikhi?

    While the turban/dastar have explicitly religious significance for Sikhs, they are also secular. That said, I don’t think it’s appropriate for the school to require everyone to wear it. Does that “water down” the religious meaning and significance? This is different, in my opinion, than when a non-Catholic attends Catholic school, for example. While there is certainly a uniform, and you may have to take Bible study courses as part of the “religious” core of the school, it is not appropriate to require this in the uniform. The school cannot argue on one hand that it is religious and thus requires a uniform and then say that the turban has a long secular history, so this shouldn’t pose a burden.

    Sikhi is fundamentally a faith that remains open to the religious diversity and freedom of practice of other faith groups. I don’t see how this policy embraces the conceptual teachings or physical manifestations of the faith.

  23. Reemas says:

    Forcing is a bad thing, no matter what. Like in UK, they forced muslim girls not to wear hijab (vice versa).

    Reemas,

    PrivateMarriage.com

  24. Reemas says:

    Forcing is a bad thing, no matter what. Like in UK, they forced muslim girls not to wear hijab (vice versa).

    Reemas,
    PrivateMarriage.com

  25. Kaptaan says:

    Kalgidhar Trust has every right to do as it pleases. This is a school system run by them and if people don't like it, then that's too bad for them. I agree with the reasons outlined by the official spokesperson written earlier…

    Kaptaan

  26. Lotay says:

    The point of the matter is that this is private school and all students are told about the uniform and school practices before they join. The school has had no problems about any of this since it opened so why the big fuss now?? students are wellcome to join other schools and are never forced to convert to any religion. Indian media has done a very good job in linking this to the french policy.

  27. Lotay says:

    The point of the matter is that this is private school and all students are told about the uniform and school practices before they join. The school has had no problems about any of this since it opened so why the big fuss now?? students are wellcome to join other schools and are never forced to convert to any religion. Indian media has done a very good job in linking this to the french policy.

  28. Kaptaan says:

    Kalgidhar Trust has every right to do as it pleases. This is a school system run by them and if people don’t like it, then that’s too bad for them. I agree with the reasons outlined by the official spokesperson written earlier…

    Kaptaan

  29. meeka says:

    this is a sikh school which promotes sikhism.It has helped hindu children in H.P. with a very very little tuitions fees as compared to sikh children. All the hindu parents know about its uniform requirements. I beleive they just can't comprehend the idea that the sikhs have good school,therefore they want to tarnish its reputation; try to shut it down based on discrimination.As for history, if our gurus knew how their sikhs would be treated by the people they saved, the gurus and other great sikhs would have never sacrificed themself for the hindus!

  30. meeka says:

    this is a sikh school which promotes sikhism.It has helped hindu children in H.P. with a very very little tuitions fees as compared to sikh children. All the hindu parents know about its uniform requirements. I beleive they just can’t comprehend the idea that the sikhs have good school,therefore they want to tarnish its reputation; try to shut it down based on discrimination.As for history, if our gurus knew how their sikhs would be treated by the people they saved, the gurus and other great sikhs would have never sacrificed themself for the hindus!

  31. sizzle says:

    Meeka, what you've just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever read. At no point in your rambling, incoherent post were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone at this site is now dumber for having read it. I award you no brownie points, and may God have mercy on your soul.

  32. sizzle says:

    Meeka, what you’ve just said is one of the most insanely idiotic things I have ever read. At no point in your rambling, incoherent post were you even close to anything that could be considered a rational thought. Everyone at this site is now dumber for having read it. I award you no brownie points, and may God have mercy on your soul.

  33. meeka says:

    Sizzle, I believe what i said is true, because you are pretty rattled. You have no right to call my comments idiotic or other readers dumb, if you disagree, that is fine!! but the immature language you use is childish! God will have mercy on me, i help the poor when i go to india even if they are non-sikhs, which is often because my children study at Baru Sahib in H.P.

  34. meeka says:

    Sizzle, I believe what i said is true, because you are pretty rattled. You have no right to call my comments idiotic or other readers dumb, if you disagree, that is fine!! but the immature language you use is childish! God will have mercy on me, i help the poor when i go to india even if they are non-sikhs, which is often because my children study at Baru Sahib in H.P.

  35. sizzle says:

    hi meeka – i apologize, that was uncalled for. i do disagree with pretty much everything you said, though, i could have said i nicer.

    anyways, that's actually a line from the movie "billy madison," so it would have been hilarious if you responded with, "okaayy…a simple "wrong" would have worked."

    [Sizzle, your apology is noted, but still a warning must be issued. "Play Nice!"…….Admin Singh]

  36. sizzle says:

    hi meeka – i apologize, that was uncalled for. i do disagree with pretty much everything you said, though, i could have said i nicer.

    anyways, that’s actually a line from the movie “billy madison,” so it would have been hilarious if you responded with, “okaayy…a simple “wrong” would have worked.”

    [Sizzle, your apology is noted, but still a warning must be issued. “Play Nice!”…….Admin Singh]

  37. A non-Sikh says:

    I think that turbans for non-Sikhs are a good idea as people can see who is on a pilgamage and who is not on one!!:)

  38. A non-Sikh says:

    I think that turbans for non-Sikhs are a good idea as people can see who is on a pilgamage and who is not on one!!:)

  39. Phulkari says:

    A non-Sikh,

    WHAT?

  40. Phulkari says:

    A non-Sikh,

    WHAT?

  41. Rana says:

    Is it over ?

    Manmohan Singh is once called Turbunator cause he wear Turban & politically rising . But by wearing turban its not a guarantee you rise.

    What will happen if a school in Jordan ask all Girls to wear Burqas, I think the Hindus & Sikhs will come together then.

    Buy Giving comments like I pay to non-sikhs & Akal Academey is helping non-sikhs, make many years of efforts to society they serve go waste. I also like to add don't try malign the greatness of gurus by saying they saved hindus. Gurus are for mankind, not for sikhs alone.

    Let all Sardars remain Sardars(Leaders) & show some leadership here by leading the society not just thinking about sikhs.

  42. Rana says:

    Is it over ?

    Manmohan Singh is once called Turbunator cause he wear Turban & politically rising . But by wearing turban its not a guarantee you rise.

    What will happen if a school in Jordan ask all Girls to wear Burqas, I think the Hindus & Sikhs will come together then.

    Buy Giving comments like I pay to non-sikhs & Akal Academey is helping non-sikhs, make many years of efforts to society they serve go waste. I also like to add don’t try malign the greatness of gurus by saying they saved hindus. Gurus are for mankind, not for sikhs alone.

    Let all Sardars remain Sardars(Leaders) & show some leadership here by leading the society not just thinking about sikhs.

  43. […] Turbans For Non Sikhs Just Part Of The School Uniform The Posted by root 10 minutes ago (http://thelangarhall.com) The cheema mandi near sangrur punjab branch of akal academy buru sahib is requiring all non sikh the large block quote in jodha comment captures my sentiment pretty well all rights reserved powered by wordpress Discuss  |  Bury |  News | Turbans For Non Sikhs Just Part Of The School Uniform The […]

  44. […] Turbans For Non Sikhs Just Part Of The School Uniform The Posted by root 30 minutes ago (http://thelangarhall.com) The cheema mandi near sangrur punjab branch of akal academy buru sahib is requiring all non sikh the large block quote in jodha comment captures my sentiment pretty well all rights reserved powered by wordpress Discuss  |  Bury |  News | Turbans For Non Sikhs Just Part Of The School Uniform The […]