Sikhs as Superheroes

Only every so often I come across a petition in my inbox which advocates for an issue that I feel strongly about. I find myself more than happy to take the few minutes required to click on the links and add my name to the “Undersigned.” A few days ago, I was sent another such petition, but to be quite honest I didn’t quite know what to make of it.

The petition, drafted in response to an advertisement for the upcoming Spinning Wheel Film Festivals, states that the “superhero” image being used depicts Sikhs in a negative manner. The author(s) suggest that the characters shown in the posterare portrayed in ways that goagainst the Sikh Rehat Maryada and Gursikh principles.

The current poster diminishes Sikh identity by playing fast and loose with Sikh Rehat Maryada in presenting the lead male and female characters as superheroes and role models. They appear more as villains, abandoning the true Sikh virtues. Going about “saving the world” with the hair uncovered is far from being obedient to Sikh Rehat and to the visible identification as a Gursikh. The Kirpan is supposed to be worn in a Gatra, not attached to a belt. Furthermore, pierced ears as in the case of the young girl are not in the spirit of how Sikhs should raise their children towards principled Sikh living.

I have my own opinions about the SWFF as it stands today, and although I was somewhat surprised by the choice of promotional material being used (from an aesthetic perspective) – I was much more intrigued about the nature and origin of the petition. I don’t know who authored the petition (does it matter?), but it brings up a much larger issue. The petition goes beyond a simple commentary of promotional material. The various comments left on the petition (even the incoherent ones) suggest that many individuals within our community still believe that Sikhs are only defined by certain external attributes:

This is really painful to see inadequate and incorrect portrayal of Sikhs. If we want our next generation to see their community portrayed in the right context in media so that it induces Charhdikala in them, we need to wake up and think about how to preserve our true identity and instilling pride in it.

We are ordinary folk, not supermen/women/children.

I do not fully agree with the petition in terms of a sri sahib having to be in a gathra and us not being able to show ourselves as ‘super sikhs’.

Here at TLH, we’re all about addressing images that misrepresent Sikhs but, for me, this petition is creating more divisions within our community.As Sikhs we all appreciatethat the Sikh Rehat Maryada is our accepted code of conduct and it is something we should all try to uphold. However, embedding a sense of fear, as I believe this petition does, is doing more damage than good. The SWFF, for example,has not historically been a festival depicting Sikhs in only their single-faceted Gursikh light (e.g., many films are geared towards a much wider (non-Sikh) audience which can be evidenced by films such as “Ocean of Pearls”). But where do we draw the line? We are finally celebrating Sikh art and many will agree that events such as the elite SWFF have done a lot of good for our community. If we are going to petition the poster -are we also going topetition the films being shown since they do not all align with the Sikh Rehat Maryada? Then what about the Sikhnet Youth Film Festival – will we also attack those efforts since not all the films depict characters or are produced by individuals whoare fully Gursikh?

If you ask me, it’s a slippery (and complicated) slope…

[Disclaimer: I have posted the image above in order to provide context. In no way is this an endorsement of the image or of SWFF’s use of it.]


bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark
tabs-top


43 Responses to “Sikhs as Superheroes”

  1. whatsinaname says:

    Personal view… the dipiction of Sikhs as 'superheros' is less derogatory than the dipiction of singhs as village idiots and gangsters with pencil line 'beards' (Singh is King) Was there a petition against this film too?

    Everyone has a right to an opinion… but a petition is taking it a bit far…

  2. whatsinaname says:

    Personal view… the dipiction of Sikhs as ‘superheros’ is less derogatory than the dipiction of singhs as village idiots and gangsters with pencil line ‘beards’ (Singh is King) Was there a petition against this film too?

    Everyone has a right to an opinion… but a petition is taking it a bit far…

  3. whatsinaname says:

    Personal view… the dipiction of Sikhs as ‘superheros’ is less derogatory than the dipiction of singhs as village idiots and gangsters with pencil line ‘beards’ (Singh is King) Was there a petition against this film too?

    Everyone has a right to an opinion… but a petition is taking it a bit far…

  4. My first question in my mind when I saw the petition was if the authors contacted Spinning Wheel Film Festival and tried to discuss the issue in an open and neutral way (before condemning them). My experience on SikhNet is that most of the time people want to create a drama and get attention and feel like they are doing something good. It's sad, but I think many people create dramas and judge others because their life lacks something and they are trying to create something to excite their life. It's too easy to do it online too in the shelter of your computer with some anonymous alias.

    People choose to start posting complaints in forums and elsewhere without even contacting the source. When these things happen at SikhNet I think…why can't these people just discuss questions and issues with us directly?? Being diplomatic goes a lot further in unification and actually getting the result you want. The sad fact has been that most of the times it is not about the issue and resolving it peacefully. If you complain to someone yelling and abusing them, then it is not likely you'll get the desired result. I think many Sikhs let the warrior part get out of control and forget about the wise saintly aspect.

    I sometimes feel that too much effort goes into finding faults in people's efforts and they overlook the good things that are being done. If SikhNet makes one little mistake…then all of a sudden we are "BAD". I think we would be better off using our energy to do positive things (though I think some people think that they are doing something positive by criticizing every thing that someone does).

    I don't think the images that SWFF used represent Sikhs well since the women are a bit "too sexy", however I'm not going to get on the "picket line" over this issue. For all we know they made this image with good intentions and didn't understand how it might be perceived (especially since many of the people involved in these organizations are not keshdari/practicing sikhs…so might not understand).

  5. My first question in my mind when I saw the petition was if the authors contacted Spinning Wheel Film Festival and tried to discuss the issue in an open and neutral way (before condemning them). My experience on SikhNet is that most of the time people want to create a drama and get attention and feel like they are doing something good. It’s sad, but I think many people create dramas and judge others because their life lacks something and they are trying to create something to excite their life. It’s too easy to do it online too in the shelter of your computer with some anonymous alias.

    People choose to start posting complaints in forums and elsewhere without even contacting the source. When these things happen at SikhNet I think…why can’t these people just discuss questions and issues with us directly?? Being diplomatic goes a lot further in unification and actually getting the result you want. The sad fact has been that most of the times it is not about the issue and resolving it peacefully. If you complain to someone yelling and abusing them, then it is not likely you’ll get the desired result. I think many Sikhs let the warrior part get out of control and forget about the wise saintly aspect.

    I sometimes feel that too much effort goes into finding faults in people’s efforts and they overlook the good things that are being done. If SikhNet makes one little mistake…then all of a sudden we are “BAD”. I think we would be better off using our energy to do positive things (though I think some people think that they are doing something positive by criticizing every thing that someone does).

    I don’t think the images that SWFF used represent Sikhs well since the women are a bit “too sexy”, however I’m not going to get on the “picket line” over this issue. For all we know they made this image with good intentions and didn’t understand how it might be perceived (especially since many of the people involved in these organizations are not keshdari/practicing sikhs…so might not understand).

  6. kudrat singh says:

    I never understood why the sikhs (and the minorities generaly speaking) they like so much to pull a bullet in their own foot.

    This is definitely not a negative representation.

    Our best asset is the capital of sympathy and our image of tolerance and human qualities we have developped worldwide in the last few years (Thanks the french secularists)

    Let us not spoil it and let us try to avoid appearing as narrow-minded as the others. That is the value we can add to western societies.

  7. […] recent post, addressing the portayal of Sikhs in an ad for the upcoming Spinning Wheel festival, brings up an interesting tension for […]

  8. kudrat singh says:

    I never understood why the sikhs (and the minorities generaly speaking) they like so much to pull a bullet in their own foot.

    This is definitely not a negative representation.

    Our best asset is the capital of sympathy and our image of tolerance and human qualities we have developped worldwide in the last few years (Thanks the french secularists)

    Let us not spoil it and let us try to avoid appearing as narrow-minded as the others. That is the value we can add to western societies.

  9. kudrat singh says:

    I never understood why the sikhs (and the minorities generaly speaking) they like so much to pull a bullet in their own foot.

    This is definitely not a negative representation.

    Our best asset is the capital of sympathy and our image of tolerance and human qualities we have developped worldwide in the last few years (Thanks the french secularists)

    Let us not spoil it and let us try to avoid appearing as narrow-minded as the others. That is the value we can add to western societies.

  10. The girls are hot and the guy has a trimmed beard. Those are the first things I noticed. It didn't bring to mind what I hold 'Sikhi' or the Sikh Dharma to represent. I'd be more inclined to believe it was a poster for a Punjabi-cultural event, which unfortunately connotates a lot of drinking and fighting in my mind and would certainly turn me away.

    I would prefer they and all other Sikhs start promoting the Khalsa roop as our super hero image. That's historically correct. But a lot of guys want to look 'smart' in their suits and trimmed beards and a lot of girls want to look 'hot' with their styled hair and skin-tight clothes. So I've personally given up on the idea that other Sikhs will represent the Khalsa roop positively.

    The petition is too much, however, because it is written from a narrow, condemning, and holier-than-thou attitude.

  11. The girls are hot and the guy has a trimmed beard. Those are the first things I noticed. It didn’t bring to mind what I hold ‘Sikhi’ or the Sikh Dharma to represent. I’d be more inclined to believe it was a poster for a Punjabi-cultural event, which unfortunately connotates a lot of drinking and fighting in my mind and would certainly turn me away.
    I would prefer they and all other Sikhs start promoting the Khalsa roop as our super hero image. That’s historically correct. But a lot of guys want to look ‘smart’ in their suits and trimmed beards and a lot of girls want to look ‘hot’ with their styled hair and skin-tight clothes. So I’ve personally given up on the idea that other Sikhs will represent the Khalsa roop positively.
    The petition is too much, however, because it is written from a narrow, condemning, and holier-than-thou attitude.

  12. The girls are hot and the guy has a trimmed beard. Those are the first things I noticed. It didn’t bring to mind what I hold ‘Sikhi’ or the Sikh Dharma to represent. I’d be more inclined to believe it was a poster for a Punjabi-cultural event, which unfortunately connotates a lot of drinking and fighting in my mind and would certainly turn me away.
    I would prefer they and all other Sikhs start promoting the Khalsa roop as our super hero image. That’s historically correct. But a lot of guys want to look ‘smart’ in their suits and trimmed beards and a lot of girls want to look ‘hot’ with their styled hair and skin-tight clothes. So I’ve personally given up on the idea that other Sikhs will represent the Khalsa roop positively.
    The petition is too much, however, because it is written from a narrow, condemning, and holier-than-thou attitude.

  13. Prem says:

    Furthermore, pierced ears as in the case of the young girl are not in the spirit of how Sikhs should raise their children towards principled Sikh living.

    Sikh Taliban in the area.

  14. Prem says:

    Our best asset is the capital of sympathy and our image of tolerance and human qualities we have developped worldwide in the last few years (Thanks the french secularists)

    Let us not spoil it and let us try to avoid appearing as narrow-minded as the others. That is the value we can add to western societies.

    Brilliantly said. However, your words will not be heeded. To these narrow minded, hysterical and bigoted individuals, who organise lynch mobs to vandalise theaters, and make threats of violence either explicitly or implicitly against any individual they consider to have offended them, they are doing a righteous thing. They are in the ascendant, and will never see any sense. I don't see whatever reputation Sikhs have for tolerance lasting much longer while these warriors are about.

  15. Prem says:

    Furthermore, pierced ears as in the case of the young girl are not in the spirit of how Sikhs should raise their children towards principled Sikh living.

    Sikh Taliban in the area.

  16. Prem says:

    Furthermore, pierced ears as in the case of the young girl are not in the spirit of how Sikhs should raise their children towards principled Sikh living.

    Sikh Taliban in the area.

  17. Prem says:

    Our best asset is the capital of sympathy and our image of tolerance and human qualities we have developped worldwide in the last few years (Thanks the french secularists)

    Let us not spoil it and let us try to avoid appearing as narrow-minded as the others. That is the value we can add to western societies.

    Brilliantly said. However, your words will not be heeded. To these narrow minded, hysterical and bigoted individuals, who organise lynch mobs to vandalise theaters, and make threats of violence either explicitly or implicitly against any individual they consider to have offended them, they are doing a righteous thing. They are in the ascendant, and will never see any sense. I don’t see whatever reputation Sikhs have for tolerance lasting much longer while these warriors are about.

  18. Prem says:

    Our best asset is the capital of sympathy and our image of tolerance and human qualities we have developped worldwide in the last few years (Thanks the french secularists)

    Let us not spoil it and let us try to avoid appearing as narrow-minded as the others. That is the value we can add to western societies.

    Brilliantly said. However, your words will not be heeded. To these narrow minded, hysterical and bigoted individuals, who organise lynch mobs to vandalise theaters, and make threats of violence either explicitly or implicitly against any individual they consider to have offended them, they are doing a righteous thing. They are in the ascendant, and will never see any sense. I don’t see whatever reputation Sikhs have for tolerance lasting much longer while these warriors are about.

  19. P.Singh says:

    Prem,

    You wrote your one-liner – "Sikh Taliban in the area" – after careful consideration? This categorization of those supporting the petition as "Taliban" was meant to be more than an outright insult? It certainly didn't come across as having any degree of careful consideration.

    Moreover, I didn't read about any threat of physical violence, or any indication there are mobs being organized. You're referencing violence in events not related to this petition in order to justify your ill-considered one-liner – it doesn't make sense.

    Furthermore, pierced ears as in the case of the young girl are not in the spirit of how Sikhs should raise their children towards principled Sikh living.

    The value or foolishness of the petition aside, the Sikh rehat prohibits ear piercings. As such, I see no problem with the sentiment expressed in the above quote. A devout Sikh is not going to encourage his/her children to pierce their ears. I fail to see how such a Sikh is "Taliban" for wanting their children to follow the teachings and instructions of the Sikh Gurus.

    There are many of us (myself included at times) too weak to follow Sikh principles and rehat properly/completely, and many of us will use any number of justifications to rationalize our weakness, but this has no bearing on the highlighted quote above.

    Finally, labelling the individual as "Taliban" is a cheap, distasteful insult – I expect to hear it from uneducated, racist hicks, not from other Sikhs. You did not provide an argument or analysis of the quote, but instead, chose to label and insult. (Then you provided a rationalization when challenged by Camille).

    That you "carefully" considered using the phrase "Sikh Taliban" and chose to insult and attack the individual in question – not his/her argument or position – is enlightening.

  20. Camille says:

    Prem, your comments are gross exaggerations of others comments and are across the line. Understand that in an online forum it is difficult to gauge tone, but I would caution for assuming good intent before referring to others as the "Sikh Taliban."

    For example, perhaps the ear piercing comment seemed extreme to you, but the Rehit Maryada is specific on this issue — instead of assuming your co-commenter is insane, perhaps try to fill in the gaps.

    — on the subject at hand —

    I think what I found uncomfortable about this poster is that it recasts Sikhs in a very Western, commercial, typical image of what a super-hero is. The outfits are not, in my opinion, particularly appropriate and tend to emphasize values (e.g., the hyper-sexualization of women and hyper-masculinization of men) that I'm not sure I'd want my nephews to adopt. I think it would have been much more interesting to turn the visual image we have of super heroes on its head and to present an alternate vision of what a Sikh super hero would look like. It's not enough to put a dhari and dastaar on someone and be "Sikh" in image or countenance.

    That said, I think the project has potential, and I think there's a value to trying to create items that encourage kids to be proud of their heritage and image, particularly if you live in a country where your faith does not (visually) reflect the same image as the majority.

  21. Prem says:

    Camille, I use the phrase Sikh Taliban very carefully. It refers to those who start off petitions because a Sikh girl is depicted wearing an earring. It refers to all those intolerant people who try to stifle free speech and simple representation of reality. It refers to those who organise mobs to intimidate those they disagree with. It refers to those who threaten violence, whose interventions have an undercurrent of violent threat, it refers to highly puritan attitudes which actively seeks to impose their vision of Sikh life collectively. So it is a very measured and deliberate phrase which is appropriate in this context.

    Sikhi is under threat because a girl is pictured in a cartoon wearing an earring! Someone save us!

  22. Camille says:

    Prem, your comments are gross exaggerations of others comments and are across the line. Understand that in an online forum it is difficult to gauge tone, but I would caution for assuming good intent before referring to others as the “Sikh Taliban.”

    For example, perhaps the ear piercing comment seemed extreme to you, but the Rehit Maryada is specific on this issue — instead of assuming your co-commenter is insane, perhaps try to fill in the gaps.

    — on the subject at hand —
    I think what I found uncomfortable about this poster is that it recasts Sikhs in a very Western, commercial, typical image of what a super-hero is. The outfits are not, in my opinion, particularly appropriate and tend to emphasize values (e.g., the hyper-sexualization of women and hyper-masculinization of men) that I’m not sure I’d want my nephews to adopt. I think it would have been much more interesting to turn the visual image we have of super heroes on its head and to present an alternate vision of what a Sikh super hero would look like. It’s not enough to put a dhari and dastaar on someone and be “Sikh” in image or countenance.

    That said, I think the project has potential, and I think there’s a value to trying to create items that encourage kids to be proud of their heritage and image, particularly if you live in a country where your faith does not (visually) reflect the same image as the majority.

  23. Camille says:

    Prem, your comments are gross exaggerations of others comments and are across the line. Understand that in an online forum it is difficult to gauge tone, but I would caution for assuming good intent before referring to others as the “Sikh Taliban.”

    For example, perhaps the ear piercing comment seemed extreme to you, but the Rehit Maryada is specific on this issue — instead of assuming your co-commenter is insane, perhaps try to fill in the gaps.

    — on the subject at hand —
    I think what I found uncomfortable about this poster is that it recasts Sikhs in a very Western, commercial, typical image of what a super-hero is. The outfits are not, in my opinion, particularly appropriate and tend to emphasize values (e.g., the hyper-sexualization of women and hyper-masculinization of men) that I’m not sure I’d want my nephews to adopt. I think it would have been much more interesting to turn the visual image we have of super heroes on its head and to present an alternate vision of what a Sikh super hero would look like. It’s not enough to put a dhari and dastaar on someone and be “Sikh” in image or countenance.

    That said, I think the project has potential, and I think there’s a value to trying to create items that encourage kids to be proud of their heritage and image, particularly if you live in a country where your faith does not (visually) reflect the same image as the majority.

  24. Prem says:

    Camille, I use the phrase Sikh Taliban very carefully. It refers to those who start off petitions because a Sikh girl is depicted wearing an earring. It refers to all those intolerant people who try to stifle free speech and simple representation of reality. It refers to those who organise mobs to intimidate those they disagree with. It refers to those who threaten violence, whose interventions have an undercurrent of violent threat, it refers to highly puritan attitudes which actively seeks to impose their vision of Sikh life collectively. So it is a very measured and deliberate phrase which is appropriate in this context.

    Sikhi is under threat because a girl is pictured in a cartoon wearing an earring! Someone save us!

  25. Prem says:

    Camille, I use the phrase Sikh Taliban very carefully. It refers to those who start off petitions because a Sikh girl is depicted wearing an earring. It refers to all those intolerant people who try to stifle free speech and simple representation of reality. It refers to those who organise mobs to intimidate those they disagree with. It refers to those who threaten violence, whose interventions have an undercurrent of violent threat, it refers to highly puritan attitudes which actively seeks to impose their vision of Sikh life collectively. So it is a very measured and deliberate phrase which is appropriate in this context.

    Sikhi is under threat because a girl is pictured in a cartoon wearing an earring! Someone save us!

  26. P.Singh says:

    Prem,

    You wrote your one-liner – “Sikh Taliban in the area” – after careful consideration? This categorization of those supporting the petition as “Taliban” was meant to be more than an outright insult? It certainly didn’t come across as having any degree of careful consideration.

    Moreover, I didn’t read about any threat of physical violence, or any indication there are mobs being organized. You’re referencing violence in events not related to this petition in order to justify your ill-considered one-liner – it doesn’t make sense.

    Furthermore, pierced ears as in the case of the young girl are not in the spirit of how Sikhs should raise their children towards principled Sikh living.

    The value or foolishness of the petition aside, the Sikh rehat prohibits ear piercings. As such, I see no problem with the sentiment expressed in the above quote. A devout Sikh is not going to encourage his/her children to pierce their ears. I fail to see how such a Sikh is “Taliban” for wanting their children to follow the teachings and instructions of the Sikh Gurus.

    There are many of us (myself included at times) too weak to follow Sikh principles and rehat properly/completely, and many of us will use any number of justifications to rationalize our weakness, but this has no bearing on the highlighted quote above.

    Finally, labelling the individual as “Taliban” is a cheap, distasteful insult – I expect to hear it from uneducated, racist hicks, not from other Sikhs. You did not provide an argument or analysis of the quote, but instead, chose to label and insult. (Then you provided a rationalization when challenged by Camille).

    That you “carefully” considered using the phrase “Sikh Taliban” and chose to insult and attack the individual in question – not his/her argument or position – is enlightening.

  27. P.Singh says:

    Prem,

    You wrote your one-liner – “Sikh Taliban in the area” – after careful consideration? This categorization of those supporting the petition as “Taliban” was meant to be more than an outright insult? It certainly didn’t come across as having any degree of careful consideration.

    Moreover, I didn’t read about any threat of physical violence, or any indication there are mobs being organized. You’re referencing violence in events not related to this petition in order to justify your ill-considered one-liner – it doesn’t make sense.

    Furthermore, pierced ears as in the case of the young girl are not in the spirit of how Sikhs should raise their children towards principled Sikh living.

    The value or foolishness of the petition aside, the Sikh rehat prohibits ear piercings. As such, I see no problem with the sentiment expressed in the above quote. A devout Sikh is not going to encourage his/her children to pierce their ears. I fail to see how such a Sikh is “Taliban” for wanting their children to follow the teachings and instructions of the Sikh Gurus.

    There are many of us (myself included at times) too weak to follow Sikh principles and rehat properly/completely, and many of us will use any number of justifications to rationalize our weakness, but this has no bearing on the highlighted quote above.

    Finally, labelling the individual as “Taliban” is a cheap, distasteful insult – I expect to hear it from uneducated, racist hicks, not from other Sikhs. You did not provide an argument or analysis of the quote, but instead, chose to label and insult. (Then you provided a rationalization when challenged by Camille).

    That you “carefully” considered using the phrase “Sikh Taliban” and chose to insult and attack the individual in question – not his/her argument or position – is enlightening.

  28. Prem says:

    That you “carefully” considered using the phrase “Sikh Taliban” and chose to insult and attack the individual in question – not his/her argument or position – is enlightening

    Yes, it is enlightening of the reactionary, chauvinist attitude of those who fixate on the appearence of girls / women and men to use as a baseball bat to bully anyone who represents Sikhs in benign and realistic ways, even those who make superhero cartoons to promote a film festival. Thanks for the support.

  29. Prem says:

    That you carefully considered using the phrase Sikh Taliban and chose to insult and attack the individual in question – not his/her argument or position – is enlightening

    Yes, it is enlightening of the reactionary, chauvinist attitude of those who fixate on the appearence of girls / women and men to use as a baseball bat to bully anyone who represents Sikhs in benign and realistic ways, even those who make superhero cartoons to promote a film festival. Thanks for the support.

  30. Prem says:

    That you carefully considered using the phrase Sikh Taliban and chose to insult and attack the individual in question – not his/her argument or position – is enlightening

    Yes, it is enlightening of the reactionary, chauvinist attitude of those who fixate on the appearence of girls / women and men to use as a baseball bat to bully anyone who represents Sikhs in benign and realistic ways, even those who make superhero cartoons to promote a film festival. Thanks for the support.

  31. P.Singh says:

    [quote comment="7212"]

    That you “carefully” considered using the phrase “Sikh Taliban” and chose to insult and attack the individual in question – not his/her argument or position – is enlightening

    Yes, it is enlightening of the reactionary, chauvinist attitude of those who fixate on the appearence of girls / women and men to use as a baseball bat to bully anyone who represents Sikhs in benign and realistic ways, even those who make superhero cartoons to promote a film festival. Thanks for the support.[/quote]

    I don't support insults and labels like "Sikh Taliban" – I'd much rather engage in discussion and debate of the issues. Your empty rhetoric does little to deflect from your "carefully" distasteful approach to this discussion. Cheers.

  32. I agree, if I was going to use the term "Sikh Taliban" which I don't think I ever would. I wouldn't use it to argue in support of a point that is clearly against the rehit. People call me fanatic, simply because I wear bana all the time and am a very enthusiastic Sikh, and am willing to share my opinion. I never thought sharing an opinion was fanatic, I figured forcing an opinion was the trademark of fanatics, and I don't do that.

  33. P.Singh says:

    [quote comment=”7212″]

    That you carefully considered using the phrase Sikh Taliban and chose to insult and attack the individual in question – not his/her argument or position – is enlightening

    Yes, it is enlightening of the reactionary, chauvinist attitude of those who fixate on the appearence of girls / women and men to use as a baseball bat to bully anyone who represents Sikhs in benign and realistic ways, even those who make superhero cartoons to promote a film festival. Thanks for the support.[/quote]

    I don’t support insults and labels like “Sikh Taliban” – I’d much rather engage in discussion and debate of the issues. Your empty rhetoric does little to deflect from your “carefully” distasteful approach to this discussion. Cheers.

  34. P.Singh says:

    [quote comment=”7212″]

    That you carefully considered using the phrase Sikh Taliban and chose to insult and attack the individual in question – not his/her argument or position – is enlightening

    Yes, it is enlightening of the reactionary, chauvinist attitude of those who fixate on the appearence of girls / women and men to use as a baseball bat to bully anyone who represents Sikhs in benign and realistic ways, even those who make superhero cartoons to promote a film festival. Thanks for the support.[/quote]

    I don’t support insults and labels like “Sikh Taliban” – I’d much rather engage in discussion and debate of the issues. Your empty rhetoric does little to deflect from your “carefully” distasteful approach to this discussion. Cheers.

  35. I agree, if I was going to use the term “Sikh Taliban” which I don’t think I ever would. I wouldn’t use it to argue in support of a point that is clearly against the rehit. People call me fanatic, simply because I wear bana all the time and am a very enthusiastic Sikh, and am willing to share my opinion. I never thought sharing an opinion was fanatic, I figured forcing an opinion was the trademark of fanatics, and I don’t do that.

  36. I agree, if I was going to use the term “Sikh Taliban” which I don’t think I ever would. I wouldn’t use it to argue in support of a point that is clearly against the rehit. People call me fanatic, simply because I wear bana all the time and am a very enthusiastic Sikh, and am willing to share my opinion. I never thought sharing an opinion was fanatic, I figured forcing an opinion was the trademark of fanatics, and I don’t do that.

  37. kudrat singh says:

    Personnally I undesrstood the value of the bana from a personnal experience in meditation which I will share in other time and place and from the following quotation from Yogi Bhajan : "If you do not have the Bana, you do not have the Bani".

    It does not means that there is no other efficient way to practice spirituality.

    But on our way if you loose the form you loose eveything else.

  38. kudrat singh says:

    Sorry for my english I wanted to write "If you lose the form, you lose everything else".

    But now that I think of it it If you loosen the form, you might loosen everything else too.

  39. kudrat singh says:

    Personnally I undesrstood the value of the bana from a personnal experience in meditation which I will share in other time and place and from the following quotation from Yogi Bhajan : “If you do not have the Bana, you do not have the Bani”.

    It does not means that there is no other efficient way to practice spirituality.

    But on our way if you loose the form you loose eveything else.

  40. kudrat singh says:

    Personnally I undesrstood the value of the bana from a personnal experience in meditation which I will share in other time and place and from the following quotation from Yogi Bhajan : “If you do not have the Bana, you do not have the Bani”.

    It does not means that there is no other efficient way to practice spirituality.

    But on our way if you loose the form you loose eveything else.

  41. kudrat singh says:

    Sorry for my english I wanted to write “If you lose the form, you lose everything else”.

    But now that I think of it it If you loosen the form, you might loosen everything else too.

  42. kudrat singh says:

    Sorry for my english I wanted to write “If you lose the form, you lose everything else”.

    But now that I think of it it If you loosen the form, you might loosen everything else too.

  43. best site i have ever seen in punjabi world