The Romance that is Panjabiyat

I recently read an article by Christine Moliner, a French doctoral student in anthropology. The article’s title Frres ennemis? Relations between Panjabi Sikhs and Muslims in the Diaspora caught my attention and I thought it raised a number of interesting questions. While the different issues raised in the article may be of note, one that was most prominent for me is the romantic project to which I have also been delusional. It is the romance that is Panjabiyat.

Moliner aptly defines it:

partition_bros.jpgWithin this large South Asian category there co-exist several narrower types of identification that nonetheless cut across the national/religious divide. One of the most powerful ones is Panjabyat. This term of recent coinage, roughly translated as Panjabi identity, refers to the cultural heritage, the social practices, the values shared by all Panjabis, Hindus, Muslims and Sikhs, Indians, Pakistanis, and increasingly the diaspora. It is heavily loaded with nostalgia for pre-partition undivided Panjab, idealized as a unique space of communal harmony. Its usage tends to be restricted to intellectual, literary, academic or media circles, and although these valorize popular culture in their definition of Panjabyat, the term is not much used by the people. [Emphasis added]

Songs such as Gurdas Mann’s Punjabi Zubane or Hans Raj Hans’ Eh Punjab have a way to create nostalgia, where none may have ever existed. However, I find that the Panjabiyat project tends to be a Sikhs-only project in the diaspora. Caste similarities only go so far. Punjabi Sikhs romanticize about the ‘tat’ Punjabi spoken in the West and the idyllic villages that have yet to undergo Green Revolution transformation. Rarely does the gaze go the other way.

Moliner takes note of this and writes:

These linguistic patterns have been replicated in the diaspora, so that although spoken at home by all Panjabis, Panjabi is written, read and studied only by Sikhs. Hence, they alone demanded in the late 1990s a better share for Panjabi on BBC radio programs on the basis that Panjabi was the mother-tongue of the majority of British South Asians. This situation is reminiscent of the pre-partition period and of the Panjabi Suba campaign in the 1950s, when Panjabi Hindus declared Hindi, instead of Panjabi, as their mother tongue. As a result, Panjabi language and Panjabyat tend to equate in the diaspora as in India with Sikhs, and very little space is left for, or as a matter of fact claimed by Hindus and Muslims. [Emphasis added]

This may not connect with other’s hopes or even other comments made by fellow Langar-ite bloggers, but it does seem to be a reality on the ground. Why do most Hindus or Muslims not even claim this Punjabi space? Why is it that, usually, only Sikhs alone are nostalgic for this romantic world that may never have been? Do Pakistani Punjabis in the diaspora own their Muslim identity over their Punjabi identity? Have others readers [especially Sikhs] engaged in the romanticism that is Panjabiyat?

About the picture — two brothers Sheikh Aziz and Harbans Singh. Their separation and the forcible conversions that were common on both sides of the Partition can be read about here.


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31 Responses to “The Romance that is Panjabiyat”

  1. Camille says:

    I think non-Sikh Punjabis claim their right to the identity, but in a very different way. I don't meet Muslim Punjabis who idealize anything but Pakistani Punjab/Lahore. Same for Hindu Punjabis with Haryana. I think the nostalgia for a "united Punjabi identity" comes from the hope for a time (whether factually/historically true or not) when different religions coexisted and shared in cultural traditions. It's clear that linguistically and otherwise Punjabi identity and language is becoming more and more connected to the physical manifestation of Sikhs, not other religious groups.

  2. Camille says:

    I think non-Sikh Punjabis claim their right to the identity, but in a very different way. I don’t meet Muslim Punjabis who idealize anything but Pakistani Punjab/Lahore. Same for Hindu Punjabis with Haryana. I think the nostalgia for a “united Punjabi identity” comes from the hope for a time (whether factually/historically true or not) when different religions coexisted and shared in cultural traditions. It’s clear that linguistically and otherwise Punjabi identity and language is becoming more and more connected to the physical manifestation of Sikhs, not other religious groups.

  3. Reema says:

    Jodha,

    I think you led straight to the likely explanation for this:

    Do Pakistani Punjabis in the diaspora own their Muslim identity over their Punjabi identity?

    Even if religion and culture are separate things, in terms of sources of identity, the lines are really blurry because there's so much give and take between the two. As Sikhs, our entire history and identity is so interwoven into the land of Punjab, that Sikhi and Punjab seem inseparable….a Sikh without Punjab is a Sikh without most of her history. History and ancestry is a grounding force and we'd be adrift without it.

    Muslim, Christian, Hindu and other Punjabis' identities as Muslim, Christian, Hindu on the other hand, aren't tied up completely into Punjab, and so their identity isn't necessarily as dependent on Punjabiyat. They may identify as both Punjabi and Muslim/Christian/Hindu, but the latter is broader than just Punjab.

    I don't know if they own their identity as Muslim/Christian/Hindu over Punjabi but if they identify as both, the Punjabi part might not be as necessary to them as a whole…

    Even though Sikhs tend to stake ownership of Punjabiyat more than other groups, I wonder how the power structures of Punjab compared to the central governments of India and Pakistan will affect the promotion of Punjabiyat?

    In Pakistan, where Punjab is the most powerful political region, though the Punjabi zuban may be dying there, there seem to be small enclaves of people who love and embrace Punjabiyat ferociously… and though they're few, they thrive. There are Muslim poets, playwrights and writers in Lahore who are far more versed in Punjabi poetry (Sufi, Gurbani) than anyone I've met in East (Indian) Punjab, and they stage incredible plays for the public. Though this may fade in a few generations…

    I don't know where the artists of East Punjab are hiding. Does the lower status (compared to Punjab's role in Pakistan) that Punjab has in relation to the central Indian government affect the pride people take in Punjabiyat in India? Does it affect our ability to promote Punjabiyat in the diaspora?

  4. Reema says:

    Jodha,

    I think you led straight to the likely explanation for this:

    Do Pakistani Punjabis in the diaspora own their Muslim identity over their Punjabi identity?

    Even if religion and culture are separate things, in terms of sources of identity, the lines are really blurry because there’s so much give and take between the two. As Sikhs, our entire history and identity is so interwoven into the land of Punjab, that Sikhi and Punjab seem inseparable….a Sikh without Punjab is a Sikh without most of her history. History and ancestry is a grounding force and we’d be adrift without it.

    Muslim, Christian, Hindu and other Punjabis’ identities as Muslim, Christian, Hindu on the other hand, aren’t tied up completely into Punjab, and so their identity isn’t necessarily as dependent on Punjabiyat. They may identify as both Punjabi and Muslim/Christian/Hindu, but the latter is broader than just Punjab.

    I don’t know if they own their identity as Muslim/Christian/Hindu over Punjabi but if they identify as both, the Punjabi part might not be as necessary to them as a whole…

    Even though Sikhs tend to stake ownership of Punjabiyat more than other groups, I wonder how the power structures of Punjab compared to the central governments of India and Pakistan will affect the promotion of Punjabiyat?

    In Pakistan, where Punjab is the most powerful political region, though the Punjabi zuban may be dying there, there seem to be small enclaves of people who love and embrace Punjabiyat ferociously… and though they’re few, they thrive. There are Muslim poets, playwrights and writers in Lahore who are far more versed in Punjabi poetry (Sufi, Gurbani) than anyone I’ve met in East (Indian) Punjab, and they stage incredible plays for the public. Though this may fade in a few generations…

    I don’t know where the artists of East Punjab are hiding. Does the lower status (compared to Punjab’s role in Pakistan) that Punjab has in relation to the central Indian government affect the pride people take in Punjabiyat in India? Does it affect our ability to promote Punjabiyat in the diaspora?

  5. JSD says:

    I dont believe Punjabiyat is dying in West Punjab if anything I believe its been upheld more strongly and properly than in East Punjab. The written Gurmukhi, Punjabi has faded but that spoken language and understanding of Punjabi is still there. I agree where are they hiding in East Punjab? Punjabi culture has been overloaded by mainstream music companies from bombay and recently I heard that Bhangra is making a breakthrough in West Punjab…but not the Bhangra we see today (the fake stunts and what not) im talking about real bhangra traditional roots…its amazing

  6. JSD says:

    I dont believe Punjabiyat is dying in West Punjab if anything I believe its been upheld more strongly and properly than in East Punjab. The written Gurmukhi, Punjabi has faded but that spoken language and understanding of Punjabi is still there. I agree where are they hiding in East Punjab? Punjabi culture has been overloaded by mainstream music companies from bombay and recently I heard that Bhangra is making a breakthrough in West Punjab…but not the Bhangra we see today (the fake stunts and what not) im talking about real bhangra traditional roots…its amazing

  7. Mewa Singh says:

    Reema,

    What are the politics of placing Arab (Muslim) history then above Punjabi-Muslim history? If the article is correct, then most Punjabi Muslims (especially in UK, where the research was conducted) feel a far greater connection to that part of their identity.

    There is sort of a politics of victors in a sense, when one connects with often false beliefs, that they were part of some bands of Central Asian conquerors (that merely happened to be Muslim) and one has descent from them, then the vast majority of Muslims that really converted due to pirs, tribal conversions, and at times economic and forced conversions. This is not a uniquely Muslim phenomenon, those Sikhs that claim some sort of Scythian ancestry, do the same.

    With regards to your comment about a Sikh is lost without Punjab, I, wholeheartedly, agree, but I wonder then wouldn't it be true that a Punjabi-Muslim without Punjab is also lost. He/She may wish to have a greater affinity with Arab Muslim history and the like, but something in that construct seems unsatisfying. In fact amongst the hierarchies of 'true Muslims,' Arab and Persian perceptions of Pakistanis are extremely low.

    In terms of the creativity seen in Western Punjab, this would make sense. Most of the performing castes (especially Mirasis) were Muslim, but by no means all. And thus, with Partition they moved to West Punjab taking their skills and their vast reservoirs of cultural heritage with them. But as you said, this is a minority and following Pakistani politics, this is moving towards extinction.

  8. Mewa Singh says:

    Reema,

    What are the politics of placing Arab (Muslim) history then above Punjabi-Muslim history? If the article is correct, then most Punjabi Muslims (especially in UK, where the research was conducted) feel a far greater connection to that part of their identity.

    There is sort of a politics of victors in a sense, when one connects with often false beliefs, that they were part of some bands of Central Asian conquerors (that merely happened to be Muslim) and one has descent from them, then the vast majority of Muslims that really converted due to pirs, tribal conversions, and at times economic and forced conversions. This is not a uniquely Muslim phenomenon, those Sikhs that claim some sort of Scythian ancestry, do the same.

    With regards to your comment about a Sikh is lost without Punjab, I, wholeheartedly, agree, but I wonder then wouldn’t it be true that a Punjabi-Muslim without Punjab is also lost. He/She may wish to have a greater affinity with Arab Muslim history and the like, but something in that construct seems unsatisfying. In fact amongst the hierarchies of ‘true Muslims,’ Arab and Persian perceptions of Pakistanis are extremely low.

    In terms of the creativity seen in Western Punjab, this would make sense. Most of the performing castes (especially Mirasis) were Muslim, but by no means all. And thus, with Partition they moved to West Punjab taking their skills and their vast reservoirs of cultural heritage with them. But as you said, this is a minority and following Pakistani politics, this is moving towards extinction.

  9. Mewa Singh says:

    JSD,

    In theory, I would agree with you. In my own romantic visions, I would agree with you, but the reality is soemthing starkly different.

    I know that you don't believe Punjabiyat is dying in West Punjab, but that leads me to believe that you have never been there. Sure you may have friends or family, but also be aware that we seek out those 'small' sections of that society that will believe what we believe, forgetting that for the vast majority, they would hardly even recognize the word Punjabiyat.

    In East Punjab, so goes Gurmukhi goes Punjabi. Sikhs preserve Punjabi because of their religio-ethnic link to it.

    Think in terms of economic forces. For economic reasons, parents are teaching their children Hindi and English. In the consumerist society that Reema blogged about, only commodification exists. If it sells, it survives. Why does bhangra exist, while jhummar doesn't? Bhangra sells, jhummar doesn't.

    This doesn't mean that there won't be people that are cultural repositories and in a sense are walking/living/breathing museums, but their cultural capital often ends with them.

  10. Mewa Singh says:

    JSD,

    In theory, I would agree with you. In my own romantic visions, I would agree with you, but the reality is soemthing starkly different.

    I know that you don’t believe Punjabiyat is dying in West Punjab, but that leads me to believe that you have never been there. Sure you may have friends or family, but also be aware that we seek out those ‘small’ sections of that society that will believe what we believe, forgetting that for the vast majority, they would hardly even recognize the word Punjabiyat.

    In East Punjab, so goes Gurmukhi goes Punjabi. Sikhs preserve Punjabi because of their religio-ethnic link to it.

    Think in terms of economic forces. For economic reasons, parents are teaching their children Hindi and English. In the consumerist society that Reema blogged about, only commodification exists. If it sells, it survives. Why does bhangra exist, while jhummar doesn’t? Bhangra sells, jhummar doesn’t.

    This doesn’t mean that there won’t be people that are cultural repositories and in a sense are walking/living/breathing museums, but their cultural capital often ends with them.

  11. […] airport could be the airport of choice for diasporic Sikhs. Many Sikhs have bought into the Romance that is Panjabiyat, including at-times the present langa(w)r-iter. While Brars numbers may be grossly […]

  12. Anonymous says:

    Panjabiyat is not dying in Pakistan. You just never see anything about it in the media. Keep in mind the general thought in a religion is that befoer anything, you are your religion first. This is the typical attitude in Pakistan. Therefore before one is a Punjabi, one is a Muslim. It has actually helped the Pakistani Muslim community a lot. If the Indian Sikh community could also bring their religion above their culture, than there wouldn't be so many 'caste' driven gurdwaras and community schisms due to one's clan name.

    So taking on a religious identity before an ethnic identity has done more good for the Pakistani Punjabi community, especially if you compare it to the state of the Indian Sikh diaspora.

    Not to mention, Panjabis and Panjab have the strongest hold on Pakistan. Their culture has become heavily integrated into other non-Panjabi cultures of Pakistan whether it is music,sufi worship,movies,talk shows,poetry,etc. Panjabi culture has more successfully been spread in Pakistan than it has in India.

    As I said, you just really need to look into these sort of things yourselves.

  13. Anonymous says:

    Panjabiyat is not dying in Pakistan. You just never see anything about it in the media. Keep in mind the general thought in a religion is that befoer anything, you are your religion first. This is the typical attitude in Pakistan. Therefore before one is a Punjabi, one is a Muslim. It has actually helped the Pakistani Muslim community a lot. If the Indian Sikh community could also bring their religion above their culture, than there wouldn’t be so many ‘caste’ driven gurdwaras and community schisms due to one’s clan name.

    So taking on a religious identity before an ethnic identity has done more good for the Pakistani Punjabi community, especially if you compare it to the state of the Indian Sikh diaspora.

    Not to mention, Panjabis and Panjab have the strongest hold on Pakistan. Their culture has become heavily integrated into other non-Panjabi cultures of Pakistan whether it is music,sufi worship,movies,talk shows,poetry,etc. Panjabi culture has more successfully been spread in Pakistan than it has in India.

    As I said, you just really need to look into these sort of things yourselves.

  14. Harinder says:

    Sikhism as per me is not a religion as defined in Abhramic faith context.

    I think it is a "DHARMA" the qualities of which shall lead the reader to define.

    I as a child use to feel we were to protect the Punjab i /Indian culture.

    But overtime I feel we having guarded different cultures of Mankind at different points of spacetimes with whom we have fought bitter wars at different point of spacetime.

    This requires that in this context we define who we are and our relationship with Bhangara , Punjabi ,Britisher ,Kashmir etc .

    Eg :-

    1 ) Muslims were our enemies under Mughals as they tried to destroy the Indian (Hindu) Punjabi culture under their rule.

    We saved Punjabi culture from Mughal invaders .

    We then also helped "KASHMIRI PUNDITS" who were being persecuted.

    So SIKHS and INDIAN and PUNJAB got entwined and that is how most Indians see us today in that role .

    2 ) Brtish were our enemies when they invaded and destroyed our Kingdom under Maharaja Ranjit Singh. Yet we played a significant part in saving the Britisher from "NAZIS" holocoaust.

    So Sikhs and British got entwined and that is how i guess Britishers see us today .

    3 ) Today when Kashmiri Mughal culture was under attack the "SIKHS" have helped the Kashmiri people by various measure appointed by the currant PM of India. Also to raise voice against Guantánamo Bay prisioners was the daughter of Indian currant PM.

    Based on above evidence I would like to infer that.

    We have helped different moderate religions at different point of times such as the "THE HINDUS " THE CHRISTIANS" "THE MUSLIMS".

    JEWS also got help indirectly when we fought along with the Britishers against the Nazis.

    That is why I feel that we are not a "RELIGION" in a classical sense. For the defigning property of religion is that it helps its own set of people.

    Also no such word as religion exists in Punjabi Lexicon.

    We have helped differnt myriads of Religions and Cultures at different points of spacetime as

    I suggest we are the followers of "DHARMA" and not "RELIGION"

    "NANAK NAM CHADI KALA TERE BANE SARVAT THA BHALLA"

  15. Harinder says:

    Sikhism as per me is not a religion as defined in Abhramic faith context.
    I think it is a “DHARMA” the qualities of which shall lead the reader to define.
    I as a child use to feel we were to protect the Punjab i /Indian culture.

    But overtime I feel we having guarded different cultures of Mankind at different points of spacetimes with whom we have fought bitter wars at different point of spacetime.

    This requires that in this context we define who we are and our relationship with Bhangara , Punjabi ,Britisher ,Kashmir etc .

    Eg :-

    1 ) Muslims were our enemies under Mughals as they tried to destroy the Indian (Hindu) Punjabi culture under their rule.
    We saved Punjabi culture from Mughal invaders .
    We then also helped “KASHMIRI PUNDITS” who were being persecuted.
    So SIKHS and INDIAN and PUNJAB got entwined and that is how most Indians see us today in that role .

    2 ) Brtish were our enemies when they invaded and destroyed our Kingdom under Maharaja Ranjit Singh. Yet we played a significant part in saving the Britisher from “NAZIS” holocoaust.
    So Sikhs and British got entwined and that is how i guess Britishers see us today .

    3 ) Today when Kashmiri Mughal culture was under attack the “SIKHS” have helped the Kashmiri people by various measure appointed by the currant PM of India. Also to raise voice against Guantnamo Bay prisioners was the daughter of Indian currant PM.

    Based on above evidence I would like to infer that.

    We have helped different moderate religions at different point of times such as the “THE HINDUS ” THE CHRISTIANS” “THE MUSLIMS”.

    JEWS also got help indirectly when we fought along with the Britishers against the Nazis.

    That is why I feel that we are not a “RELIGION” in a classical sense. For the defigning property of religion is that it helps its own set of people.

    Also no such word as religion exists in Punjabi Lexicon.

    We have helped differnt myriads of Religions and Cultures at different points of spacetime as

    I suggest we are the followers of “DHARMA” and not “RELIGION”

    “NANAK NAM CHADI KALA TERE BANE SARVAT THA BHALLA”

  16. Anonymous says:

    Harinder,

    You have made some interesting and some good points. Sikhism is a Dharmic faith and technically it is not a religion as being Sikh only means you are a disciple of the Gurus.

    However as much as some individuals would like to identify themselves with cultural elements, it is still invalid. Even the majority of Panjabi folk culture is based on the Muslims of Panjab. I.e. Heer Ranjha,Mirza Jatt,Waris Shah,Bulleh Shah,etc.

    Muslims of Pakistan hold these people very highly. As I said before, most Indian Punjabis do not take the time to learn about their brothers on the other side of the border thus the views of many Indian Punjabis is heavily skewed.

    Additionally the 'Muslims' WERE NEVER THE ENEMIES OF THE SIKHS.

    The MUGHALS WERE THE ENEMIES OF THE INDIANS Period.

    By saying that the 'Muslims' were your enemies you are saying that Most Somalis,Arabs,Iranians,Central Asians,Indonesians,Cham Cambodians,North Africans,etc. were your enemies. But the fact is most of those groups had nothing to do with the oppression of India. The only group who had anything to do with the oppression were the MUGHALS. Otherwise your statement is only a blanket statement. And we know blanket statements are rarely ever correct.

    Additionally Dharma in the Sanskrit sense essentially means 'Faith'. There is no word for religion in the lexicon of Urdu,West Punjabi,Arabic , or Persian. All of those languages use the word 'Deen' which has the exact same meaning as Dharm. You have to learn about all parties and groups to make an informed judgment about htem my brother.

  17. Anonymous says:

    Harinder,

    You have made some interesting and some good points. Sikhism is a Dharmic faith and technically it is not a religion as being Sikh only means you are a disciple of the Gurus.

    However as much as some individuals would like to identify themselves with cultural elements, it is still invalid. Even the majority of Panjabi folk culture is based on the Muslims of Panjab. I.e. Heer Ranjha,Mirza Jatt,Waris Shah,Bulleh Shah,etc.

    Muslims of Pakistan hold these people very highly. As I said before, most Indian Punjabis do not take the time to learn about their brothers on the other side of the border thus the views of many Indian Punjabis is heavily skewed.

    Additionally the ‘Muslims’ WERE NEVER THE ENEMIES OF THE SIKHS.

    The MUGHALS WERE THE ENEMIES OF THE INDIANS Period.

    By saying that the ‘Muslims’ were your enemies you are saying that Most Somalis,Arabs,Iranians,Central Asians,Indonesians,Cham Cambodians,North Africans,etc. were your enemies. But the fact is most of those groups had nothing to do with the oppression of India. The only group who had anything to do with the oppression were the MUGHALS. Otherwise your statement is only a blanket statement. And we know blanket statements are rarely ever correct.

    Additionally Dharma in the Sanskrit sense essentially means ‘Faith’. There is no word for religion in the lexicon of Urdu,West Punjabi,Arabic , or Persian. All of those languages use the word ‘Deen’ which has the exact same meaning as Dharm. You have to learn about all parties and groups to make an informed judgment about htem my brother.

  18. Harinder says:

    It is true that Muslims of Punjab under Mughals did fill up the history then of Punjabi Folklore.

    How ever today SIKHS of Punjab have taken 'PUNJAB" to places which even MUGHALS would be envious of.

    "SIKHS also dont hate MUSLIMS" .

    But we also dont hate any one else for that matter be they be Christians, Jews ,Hindus ,Buddhist and any future alien religion we may encouonter in the future.

  19. Harinder says:

    It is true that Muslims of Punjab under Mughals did fill up the history then of Punjabi Folklore.
    How ever today SIKHS of Punjab have taken ‘PUNJAB” to places which even MUGHALS would be envious of.
    “SIKHS also dont hate MUSLIMS” .
    But we also dont hate any one else for that matter be they be Christians, Jews ,Hindus ,Buddhist and any future alien religion we may encouonter in the future.

  20. Harinder says:

    Some of the SIKH hero of that era which u folks may not know as as u all were on the other side of fence and also since SIKHS did not enjoy Political Patronage at that time under Mughals include :-

    Bhai Bachchittar Singh,Chali Mukte Mai Bhago ji,Banda Singh Bahadur,Bhai Binod Singh ,Nawaab Kapur Singh ,Bhai Tara Singh 'Wan',Baba Deep Singh,Bhai Buddh Singh ,Bhai Aghar Singh

    Bhai Bota Singh,Bhai Ala Singh ,Jassa Singh Ramgarhia

    Jassa Singh Ahluwalia,Bhai Mehtab Singh Bhai Sukkha Singh

    Bhai Gurbax Singh ,Bhai Baghel Singh ,Bhai Charat Singh

    Karam Singh Shahid ,Lahina Singh,Karorasinghia Sardars

    Gujjar Singh Bhangi,Bhai Jodh Singh Ramgarhia,Khushal Singh Singhpuria,Princess Rajinder Kaur,Bhai Tara Singh Ghaiba

    Bibi Sahib Kaur,Sikh Women Warriors,Maharaja Ranjit Singh

    Bibi Sadakaur,Akali Phula Singh,Sardar Hari Singh Nalua

    Sardarani Shranagat Kaur,Maharaja Kharak Singh,Maharaja Sher Singh

    Hukma Singh Chimni,Ranjodh Singh Majithia ,

    Though

    "Hari Singh Nalwas & Bandha Bahdur"

    became house hold name in Indian Punjab.

    Just like Dullaha Bhatti wala amongst the many warriors (Abdulla Bhatti a Rajput Muslim of Lohri fame ) did amongst the Muslims of Punjab.

  21. Harinder says:

    Some of the SIKH hero of that era which u folks may not know as as u all were on the other side of fence and also since SIKHS did not enjoy Political Patronage at that time under Mughals include :-

    Bhai Bachchittar Singh,Chali Mukte Mai Bhago ji,Banda Singh Bahadur,Bhai Binod Singh ,Nawaab Kapur Singh ,Bhai Tara Singh ‘Wan’,Baba Deep Singh,Bhai Buddh Singh ,Bhai Aghar Singh
    Bhai Bota Singh,Bhai Ala Singh ,Jassa Singh Ramgarhia
    Jassa Singh Ahluwalia,Bhai Mehtab Singh Bhai Sukkha Singh
    Bhai Gurbax Singh ,Bhai Baghel Singh ,Bhai Charat Singh
    Karam Singh Shahid ,Lahina Singh,Karorasinghia Sardars
    Gujjar Singh Bhangi,Bhai Jodh Singh Ramgarhia,Khushal Singh Singhpuria,Princess Rajinder Kaur,Bhai Tara Singh Ghaiba
    Bibi Sahib Kaur,Sikh Women Warriors,Maharaja Ranjit Singh
    Bibi Sadakaur,Akali Phula Singh,Sardar Hari Singh Nalua
    Sardarani Shranagat Kaur,Maharaja Kharak Singh,Maharaja Sher Singh
    Hukma Singh Chimni,Ranjodh Singh Majithia ,

    Though
    “Hari Singh Nalwas & Bandha Bahdur”
    became house hold name in Indian Punjab.
    Just like Dullaha Bhatti wala amongst the many warriors (Abdulla Bhatti a Rajput Muslim of Lohri fame ) did amongst the Muslims of Punjab.

  22. Roop Dhillon says:

    So which Direction to take Panjabiyat? Especially in Diapora? How about using the written Punjabi to create a 21st century trans-world Punjabi?

  23. Roop Dhillon says:

    So which Direction to take Panjabiyat? Especially in Diapora? How about using the written Punjabi to create a 21st century trans-world Punjabi?

  24. Roop Dhillon says:

    There's this image, than there is the beheading of the two Sikh Men…

  25. Roop Dhillon says:

    There's this image, than there is the beheading of the two Sikh Men…

  26. bhai says:

    There was probably never a time when there was no violence in the region, for example in the time of the Gurus. As a community our ethos and viewpoint developed in the context of a syncretic environment. Gurubani references this environment in many places. The phrase koie kah ram ram, koie khuda for example.

    As a community for a time we can live in relative sectioning off, but over time it is sapping.Many of the most electric part of our ethos are connected to a syncreticism that is not borne of naivete. It is part of the soil, simply part of the context from which the community springs and takes fullest life. More than a fantasy, it is a more full reality. The lack of this context has a significant effect.

  27. bhai says:

    There was probably never a time when there was no violence in the region, for example in the time of the Gurus. As a community our ethos and viewpoint developed in the context of a syncretic environment. Gurubani references this environment in many places. The phrase koie kah ram ram, koie khuda for example.

    As a community for a time we can live in relative sectioning off, but over time it is sapping.Many of the most electric part of our ethos are connected to a syncreticism that is not borne of naivete. It is part of the soil, simply part of the context from which the community springs and takes fullest life. More than a fantasy, it is a more full reality. The lack of this context has a significant effect.

  28. Rana says:

    The Diaspora should do something. I don't meam bhangra, that is shallow and does not teach full punjabi. We need to cultivate diaspora born and raised Punjabi writers, poets, singers, and secular ( as in relgious) attitudes, even if the Punjabi they produce is grammatically influenced by the host country language, that is, a sort of Punjabi Creole, barli boli…

  29. Rana says:

    The Diaspora should do something. I don't meam bhangra, that is shallow and does not teach full punjabi. We need to cultivate diaspora born and raised Punjabi writers, poets, singers, and secular ( as in relgious) attitudes, even if the Punjabi they produce is grammatically influenced by the host country language, that is, a sort of Punjabi Creole, barli boli…

  30. Roop Dhillon says:

    Rana if you go to bridging the divide between two generations you will see that I have been trying as a westerner to embrace panjabiyat and writing the kind of creole punjabi we speak out in the west…its just that it is so grammatically different from proper Punjabi, that not everyone in that field gets it..but why not, look how different Latin Spanish is from Orginal Spanish

  31. Roop Dhillon says:

    Rana if you go to bridging the divide between two generations you will see that I have been trying as a westerner to embrace panjabiyat and writing the kind of creole punjabi we speak out in the west…its just that it is so grammatically different from proper Punjabi, that not everyone in that field gets it..but why not, look how different Latin Spanish is from Orginal Spanish