Sad and Disturbing

In Ceres, California an 86 year old Sikh bibiji, Jagir Kaur Johal, was found stabbed to death in her home. The Modesto Bee reports:jagir.jpg

She died as a result of loss of blood from a stab wound to the chest and multiple slash wounds to the face, arms and legs, the Stanislaus County coroners office said.

Authorities said today the womans husband, 85-year-old Piara Johal, likely will be arrested.

Johal had a knife wound on his hand. The man was “suffering from some kind of confusion. He’s not sure what happened,” McKay said. “He acted as if he didn’t know of her injuries.”

This is a hard case, McKay said. Hes old. Hes feeble. We dont even know he if knows what he did — if he did it. [link]

Along time ago, a fellow Langa(w)r-iter asked:

Im wondering what anti-domestic violence advocacy campaigns and shelters are doing to address the issues faced by elderly women? [link]

While I have no insight (if Piara Singh Johal is indeed the culprit), if the tragedy was an act by a man that may be suffering from mental degradation in his old age or if there was indeed a record of domestic violence against his wife. Maybe it was both. Regardless, it is a community tragedy that the lack of such institutions, suggested by Phulkari, may have resulted in Jagir Kaur’s death.

The Modesto Bee has a guestbook for those wishing to express their condolences to the family here.


bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark bookmark
tabs-top


12 Responses to “Sad and Disturbing”

  1. Rani says:

    What bothers me greatly is the possibility that the legal system may fail to put Johal behind bars IF he is the culprit. A woman had just been stabbed to death. If there is a history of domestic violence, I can only imagine the many deaths her soul suffered prior to this horrible death.

    According to California state law in order for the insanity plea to work a person must be (1) diagnosed with a mental illness and (2) unable to 'appreciate' the depth of their crime. I really hope that if her husband, Johal, did commit the murder he does not get off on insanity. It hurts when you hear about this happening to a woman in our community, especially one who is the age of any one of our grandmothers.

  2. Rani says:

    What bothers me greatly is the possibility that the legal system may fail to put Johal behind bars IF he is the culprit. A woman had just been stabbed to death. If there is a history of domestic violence, I can only imagine the many deaths her soul suffered prior to this horrible death.

    According to California state law in order for the insanity plea to work a person must be (1) diagnosed with a mental illness and (2) unable to ‘appreciate’ the depth of their crime. I really hope that if her husband, Johal, did commit the murder he does not get off on insanity. It hurts when you hear about this happening to a woman in our community, especially one who is the age of any one of our grandmothers.

  3. Sundari says:

    It's extremely disheartening to hear this news.

    Rani, while I understand your anxiety over whether or not Johal will be put "behind bars" or whether they will use an "insanity" plea (which is usually not successful) – I think we have to take a step back and take a moment to try to understand what happened. Sure, Johal may have been the one whose individual act caused the death of his wife – but were there systems that failed this family? Was Johal suffering from dementia or another mental illness? And if this is the case, did he receive any support? It reminds me of our discussion on Looking After our Elders and whether or not this couple received help that could have potentially prevented this event from occuring. As one news report states, Johal

    hadn't seemed quite as aware of his surroundings after getting out of the hospital last week [Link].

    It just seems to suggest something more. The couple also didn't speak much English which could have been another hindrance to them obtaining help in advance. Regardless, I am saddened by this news.

  4. Sundari says:

    It’s extremely disheartening to hear this news.

    Rani, while I understand your anxiety over whether or not Johal will be put “behind bars” or whether they will use an “insanity” plea (which is usually not successful) – I think we have to take a step back and take a moment to try to understand what happened. Sure, Johal may have been the one whose individual act caused the death of his wife – but were there systems that failed this family? Was Johal suffering from dementia or another mental illness? And if this is the case, did he receive any support? It reminds me of our discussion on Looking After our Elders and whether or not this couple received help that could have potentially prevented this event from occuring. As one news report states, Johal

    hadn’t seemed quite as aware of his surroundings after getting out of the hospital last week [Link].

    It just seems to suggest something more. The couple also didn’t speak much English which could have been another hindrance to them obtaining help in advance. Regardless, I am saddened by this news.

  5. Suki says:

    It just seems to suggest something more. The couple also didn’t speak much English which could have been another hindrance to them obtaining help in advance. Regardless, I am saddened by this news.

    This couple had been in California close to 40 years and did not learn English. How is that possible.

  6. Suki says:

    It just seems to suggest something more. The couple also didnt speak much English which could have been another hindrance to them obtaining help in advance. Regardless, I am saddened by this news.

    This couple had been in California close to 40 years and did not learn English. How is that possible.

  7. Sundari says:

    Suki, It is quite possible actually. There are many people who are born and raised in the US and still can't formulate an English sentence. Nevertheless, I think you're missing the point. While I agree that things tend to be easier for immigrants who learn to speak English – it does not mean that access to culturally and linguistically relevant services should not be available for those who don't speak the language fluently.

  8. Sundari says:

    Suki, It is quite possible actually. There are many people who are born and raised in the US and still can’t formulate an English sentence. Nevertheless, I think you’re missing the point. While I agree that things tend to be easier for immigrants who learn to speak English – it does not mean that access to culturally and linguistically relevant services should not be available for those who don’t speak the language fluently.

  9. sandrar says:

    Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post… nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.

  10. sandrar says:

    Hi! I was surfing and found your blog post… nice! I love your blog. :) Cheers! Sandra. R.

  11. Education enhances the thinking skills of an individual. It enables him observe the matter rationally and go in to its details to solve various issues. It creates the ability to think logically instead of belief in rumors.

  12. Phoebe says:

    i would be busy again doing some home decors this coming christmas, i’d be buying some new decors for the season”