Nourishing Souls at the Darbar Sahib

223723_washing_up_in_the_worlds_biggest_guru_ka_langar_amritsar_india.jpgAnyone who has been blessed enough to visit the Darbar Sahib in Panjab will always speak about the amazing experience of Langar that takes place there. A free meal is provided to about 80,000 people each and every day. For those who have not visited the “Golden Temple” or perhaps are not familiar with this unique aspect of Sikhi, thisNYTimes article provides a great overview of how souls are nourished in this small complex in Amritsar. The video below is titled, Peace and Roti at the Golden Temple and highlights how langar brings people of all faiths and backgrounds together as equals.

You can view the VIDEO here.

You can view the PHOTO GALLERYhere.


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8 Responses to “Nourishing Souls at the Darbar Sahib”

  1. brooklynwala says:

    i just came across this article as well. great portrayal of sikhs and the institution of langar overall, but i was not pleased (or surprised) but the paragraph on 1984:
    "It has not always been a peaceful place. A Sikh insurgency, which sought a separate homeland for Sikhs in Punjab, tore at India’s heart in the 1970s and ’80s. In 1984, Indira Gandhi, then the prime minister, ordered a bloody raid on the temple. Hundreds of militants were hiding there, and many were killed. The temple was also damaged. Sikh bodyguards later assassinated Mrs. Gandhi to avenge the attack on the temple."

  2. brooklynwala says:

    i just came across this article as well. great portrayal of sikhs and the institution of langar overall, but i was not pleased (or surprised) but the paragraph on 1984:
    "It has not always been a peaceful place. A Sikh insurgency, which sought a separate homeland for Sikhs in Punjab, tore at India’s heart in the 1970s and ’80s. In 1984, Indira Gandhi, then the prime minister, ordered a bloody raid on the temple. Hundreds of militants were hiding there, and many were killed. The temple was also damaged. Sikh bodyguards later assassinated Mrs. Gandhi to avenge the attack on the temple."

  3. daas says:

    It also interesting to note they interviewed mostly non-sikhs and never called Darbar Sahib a Gurdwara. I hope to write to the author correcting them on the point of Temple vs. Gurdwara and the sentence "It has not always been a peaceful place. A Sikh insurgency, which sought a separate homeland for Sikhs in Punjab, tore at India’s heart in the 1970s and ’80s."

    I would hope and encourage others to write their specific corrections to the NYT as well.

    Nevertheless, a nice article showing hope for humanity in today's common news of violence and discrimination.

  4. daas says:

    It also interesting to note they interviewed mostly non-sikhs and never called Darbar Sahib a Gurdwara. I hope to write to the author correcting them on the point of Temple vs. Gurdwara and the sentence "It has not always been a peaceful place. A Sikh insurgency, which sought a separate homeland for Sikhs in Punjab, tore at India’s heart in the 1970s and ’80s."

    I would hope and encourage others to write their specific corrections to the NYT as well.

    Nevertheless, a nice article showing hope for humanity in today's common news of violence and discrimination.

  5. Blesss for sharing, I backing it's astounding that you're advancing various these unmistakable douceurs for shabby favors, I unerring extend it!

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