The Global Experience

World_cup_2010_logo.jpgWorld Cup 2010, which kicks off today, is expected to be the most-watched TV event in history. While football soccer has not historically been a largey followed sport in the U.S. – it does seem like more people want to be part of the global experience this year.

Tomorrow’s USA vs England game will be watched by many. England, a contender to win the tournament, is heavily favored, but the U.S. has history on its side. The last time the two teams played a World Cup match was 1950 in Belo Horizonte, Brazil, when the American team beat the British powerhouse 1-0 [link]!

Below the fold you’ll find K’naan’spopular World Cup Anthem “Wavin’ Flag” and the epic Nike “flashforward” commercial (note: Nike isn’t actually a sponsor of the World Cup but this ad has attracted more World Cup-relaed mentions than Adidas, Coca Cola, Sony and Visa). And for those of you who are just beginning to catch the World Cup fever – here’s an overview of what you need to know. So i ask our global Langar Hall audience – what teams will you be rooting for and how will you celebrate the World Cup?

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40 Responses to “The Global Experience”

  1. a. singh says:

    Is this some kind of sikh issue?

    • Sundari says:

      Wow – that's a bizarre question. As a Sikh woman, i consider myself to be a citizen of the world and believe it or not – i can participate in a global experience such as the World Cup games. Global issues are Sikh issues and vice versa. Not every single post on this blog needs to have the word "Sikh" in it – my identity is inherent to how i respond to issues occurring throughout the world whether it be in Panjab, in Palestine or in South Africa.

  2. Preeti says:

    I'll be rooting for the USA! Another favorite is Brazil. And, A.Singh, Sikhs are part of the global community – so yes, it is a Sikh issue. What a ridiculous thing to ask.

  3. a. singh says:

    Is this some kind of sikh issue?

    • Sundari says:

      Wow – that's a bizarre question. As a Sikh woman, i consider myself to be a citizen of the world and believe it or not – i can participate in a global experience such as the World Cup games. Global issues are Sikh issues and vice versa. Not every single post on this blog needs to have the word "Sikh" in it – my identity is inherent to how i respond to issues occurring throughout the world whether it be in Panjab, in Palestine or in South Africa.

  4. Preeti says:

    I’ll be rooting for the USA! Another favorite is Brazil. And, A.Singh, Sikhs are part of the global community – so yes, it is a Sikh issue. What a ridiculous thing to ask.

  5. a. singh says:

    @ sundari and preeti. I understand both your points, but I come to langar hall to read about sikh issues. If I needed to read about the "global experience" I can visit any number of websites and news sources to do that.
    There are no sikh issue with the world cup, what so ever.

    • Sundari says:

      A.Singh – if you read the "About" section for TLH it states: "This is a space dedicated to the experiences, reflections, and interests of a diverse group of young individuals – tied together by our common and varied identities as Sikhs in the diaspora." We identify as Sikhs but on this site we talk about all types of issues. These conversations are the same conversations we have outside of this platform and beyond the blogosphere. Please respect that.

    • Harinder says:

      One can appreciate what A Singh is trying to say.
      However TLH cannot be faulted for this.
      TLH needs "NEWS" to bring out the BLOG daily
      and if SIKHS don’t create "NEWS" then
      TLH has to imports news to keep its reader base intact.
      Beside Foot ball is also a universally loved game for TLH to report upon .
      It is now up to
      "WE SIKH PARENTS" to motivate our children to take up "SPORTS" in a manner that they can find berths in national teams of different countries where SIKHS live.
      "PRIDE IN SPORTS" is what we need

      • Harinder says:

        As parents we also need to

        1) Set up "CLUBS FOR SPORTS" some thing like the IPL , WWF, foot ball club etc to make sports a economic activity .
        2) Have healthy, children who can compete in international arena.
        We got to escape the trapping of
        1)Drugs
        2)1984 Post Traumatic Stress Disorder saga
        3)Look beyond Kabbadi our ancestral games.
        The few blue moon days when the Sikhs felt excited about being part of sporting activity was when
        1)Milkha Singh missed the gold
        2)Ajit pal Singh won the gold
        3)Abhinav Bindra won the gold
        There are thousand of sports persons on planet earth playing a variety of sports.
        We can have our share of Glory.

  6. a. singh says:

    @ sundari and preeti. I understand both your points, but I come to langar hall to read about sikh issues. If I needed to read about the "global experience" I can visit any number of websites and news sources to do that.
    There are no sikh issue with the world cup, what so ever.

    • Sundari says:

      A.Singh – if you read the "About" section for TLH it states: "This is a space dedicated to the experiences, reflections, and interests of a diverse group of young individuals – tied together by our common and varied identities as Sikhs in the diaspora." We identify as Sikhs but on this site we talk about all types of issues. These conversations are the same conversations we have outside of this platform and beyond the blogosphere. Please respect that.

    • Harinder says:

      One can appreciate what A Singh is trying to say.
      However TLH cannot be faulted for this.
      TLH needs "NEWS" to bring out the BLOG daily
      and if SIKHS don’t create "NEWS" then
      TLH has to imports news to keep its reader base intact.
      Beside Foot ball is also a universally loved game for TLH to report upon .
      It is now up to
      "WE SIKH PARENTS" to motivate our children to take up "SPORTS" in a manner that they can find berths in national teams of different countries where SIKHS live.
      "PRIDE IN SPORTS" is what we need

      • Harinder says:

        As parents we also need to

        1) Set up "CLUBS FOR SPORTS" some thing like the IPL , WWF, foot ball club etc to make sports a economic activity .
        2) Have healthy, children who can compete in international arena.
        We got to escape the trapping of
        1)Drugs
        2)1984 Post Traumatic Stress Disorder saga
        3)Look beyond Kabbadi our ancestral games.
        The few blue moon days when the Sikhs felt excited about being part of sporting activity was when
        1)Milkha Singh missed the gold
        2)Ajit pal Singh won the gold
        3)Abhinav Bindra won the gold
        There are thousand of sports persons on planet earth playing a variety of sports.
        We can have our share of Glory.

  7. Sher says:

    @Sundari

    hey please do not exclude not-so-young and not-exactly-sikhs from TLH :)

  8. Sher says:

    @Sundari

    hey please do not exclude not-so-young and not-exactly-sikhs from TLH :)

  9. Suki says:

    The Gurus didn't discriminate…why do we?
    Anyhow, its good to have some fun topics, isn't it?
    My teams are (yes I know, I always have more because England always chokes); England, Brazil (just because I've liked them since I was a kid); Ivory Coast (just because they are great humanitarian and ended a civil war – beautiful people); Slovakia (I just like an underdog and what I saw I liked); SA (for the home team); Nigeria (the gymnastics are awesome); oh I could go on but better stop now….lol

  10. Suki says:

    The Gurus didn't discriminate…why do we?
    Anyhow, its good to have some fun topics, isn't it?
    My teams are (yes I know, I always have more because England always chokes); England, Brazil (just because I've liked them since I was a kid); Ivory Coast (just because they are great humanitarian and ended a civil war – beautiful people); Slovakia (I just like an underdog and what I saw I liked); SA (for the home team); Nigeria (the gymnastics are awesome); oh I could go on but better stop now….lol

  11. I Singh says:

    The best approach to understanding Sikh issues is to see the Sikhi in everything and apply or relate to it in some way. Sure, at times one would consider it a stretch – but so what. You never know, it might trigger or inspire some positive.

    So, when you look at it, some would say that even the Olympics pales in comparison to the effect of the FIFA World Cup on uniting the various countries/communities of the world on a neutral yet challenging platform (challenging from the sports perspective). I have first hand experience of that environment as I was residing in Germany during the last FIFA World Cup in 2006.

    Taking that unifying experience and applying it to the Sikh historical context (at least) one could argue that Guru Nanak's revolution was an electrifying unifying experience for the downtrodden and underprivileged as well as the elite that were progressive enough to open their minds.

    The positive thought that comes out of this is to envisage something tangible for Sikhs to create or adopt or facilitate, in the context of 2010, that is a continuation of Guru Nanak's electrifying unifying experience for the world. In this area we (the Sikhs) are surely left wanting. Hopefully the World Cup triggers some collective action on our part.

  12. I Singh says:

    The best approach to understanding Sikh issues is to see the Sikhi in everything and apply or relate to it in some way. Sure, at times one would consider it a stretch – but so what. You never know, it might trigger or inspire some positive.

    So, when you look at it, some would say that even the Olympics pales in comparison to the effect of the FIFA World Cup on uniting the various countries/communities of the world on a neutral yet challenging platform (challenging from the sports perspective). I have first hand experience of that environment as I was residing in Germany during the last FIFA World Cup in 2006.

    Taking that unifying experience and applying it to the Sikh historical context (at least) one could argue that Guru Nanak's revolution was an electrifying unifying experience for the downtrodden and underprivileged as well as the elite that were progressive enough to open their minds.

    The positive thought that comes out of this is to envisage something tangible for Sikhs to create or adopt or facilitate, in the context of 2010, that is a continuation of Guru Nanak's electrifying unifying experience for the world. In this area we (the Sikhs) are surely left wanting. Hopefully the World Cup triggers some collective action on our part.

  13. iSingh says:

    "The best approach to understanding Sikh issues is to see the Sikhi in everything and apply or relate to it in some way."

    I cannot disagree enough with this statement. I hope such opinions are not taught in Gurudwaras to the next generation of Sikhs.

    • I Singh says:

      ?
      Would you rather confine Sikhi to Sunday in the Gurduara rather than expand the horizons and incorporate it in our daily lives?

      You have every right to disagree. Please grace me the right to agree or disagree with you once you present an alternative approach.

  14. iSingh says:

    "The best approach to understanding Sikh issues is to see the Sikhi in everything and apply or relate to it in some way."

    I cannot disagree enough with this statement. I hope such opinions are not taught in Gurudwaras to the next generation of Sikhs.

    • I Singh says:

      ?
      Would you rather confine Sikhi to Sunday in the Gurduara rather than expand the horizons and incorporate it in our daily lives?

      You have every right to disagree. Please grace me the right to agree or disagree with you once you present an alternative approach.

  15. Raven says:

    Which team you support in an international competition actually raises some interesting identity questions for diaspora communities – I've written a bit about that issue on my blog (at http://londonmasalaandchips.blogspot.com/2010/06/….

    Would, or should, for example, a British-Asian ever support England over India, if they were in the same competition?

  16. Raven says:

    Which team you support in an international competition actually raises some interesting identity questions for diaspora communities – I've written a bit about that issue on my blog (at http://londonmasalaandchips.blogspot.com/2010/06/….

    Would, or should, for example, a British-Asian ever support England over India, if they were in the same competition?

  17. Harinder says:

    Sikhs need to understand that to produce a team for FIFA or any international competetion will require so much of hard work by SIKHS that not many of us would even dream of or even summon the courage to do it.
    The boys got to be groomed from age of 10 years and the team got to function for atelast 03 years together as one .
    "SYMBOLIC SIKHS" that the present gen has become.
    So the easy anwer is a symbolic one that we currant SIKHS love to adopt.

    "SEE THE SIKHI IN EVERY THING "

  18. Harinder says:

    Sikhs need to understand that to produce a team for FIFA or any international competetion will require so much of hard work by SIKHS that not many of us would even dream of or even summon the courage to do it.
    The boys got to be groomed from age of 10 years and the team got to function for atelast 03 years together as one .
    "SYMBOLIC SIKHS" that the present gen has become.
    So the easy anwer is a symbolic one that we currant SIKHS love to adopt.

    "SEE THE SIKHI IN EVERY THING "

  19. Dosanjh says:

    There are many Sikh youngsters in the youth teams of the professional clubs in England. It's only a matter of time before a star comes to the fore.
    As for the USA v England match, I've found it quite amusing how the American media have started to think that America has become a football nation, simply because a fairly large number of Americans watched the match. They have a long way to go. Here in England the whole country shuts down during each and every match.
    Also, the Sikhs, and any other community, in America, Canada and Australia will never be accepted in Football. The reason for that is because any nation that doesn't know the name of the game and calls it something completely different deserves no football respect. Imagine if England decided they wanted to become a world force in the American game of Baseball, but said they will start playing it whilst calling it by the name of 'Bullaladingding'. Are there any Americans and Canadians that would take the English in Baseball seriously if they refer to it as bullaladingding ?

    • Dosanjh says:

      Also, the English took the game around the world and out of respect each nation kept the English word for the game : Football. It is quite amusing and truly ironic to now watch English speaking nations such as America and Canada refer to football as the Spanish or Italian 'Futball' when the Italian and Spanish said 'futball' only because they couldn't pronounce and properly spell the English word 'football'. So we have English speakers in North America pretending they can't speak English properly.
      I gave this lecture to my cousin in Vancouver. he now calls it football. I see it as my mission to get every sikh in the world calling it by its proper name. Excuse me now while I go and practice bullaladingding in time for the 'World' series. By 'world' I do of course mean the grand total of 2 countries.

  20. Dosanjh says:

    There are many Sikh youngsters in the youth teams of the professional clubs in England. It's only a matter of time before a star comes to the fore.
    As for the USA v England match, I've found it quite amusing how the American media have started to think that America has become a football nation, simply because a fairly large number of Americans watched the match. They have a long way to go. Here in England the whole country shuts down during each and every match.
    Also, the Sikhs, and any other community, in America, Canada and Australia will never be accepted in Football. The reason for that is because any nation that doesn't know the name of the game and calls it something completely different deserves no football respect. Imagine if England decided they wanted to become a world force in the American game of Baseball, but said they will start playing it whilst calling it by the name of 'Bullaladingding'. Are there any Americans and Canadians that would take the English in Baseball seriously if they refer to it as bullaladingding ?

    • Dosanjh says:

      Also, the English took the game around the world and out of respect each nation kept the English word for the game : Football. It is quite amusing and truly ironic to now watch English speaking nations such as America and Canada refer to football as the Spanish or Italian 'Futball' when the Italian and Spanish said 'futball' only because they couldn't pronounce and properly spell the English word 'football'. So we have English speakers in North America pretending they can't speak English properly.
      I gave this lecture to my cousin in Vancouver. he now calls it football. I see it as my mission to get every sikh in the world calling it by its proper name. Excuse me now while I go and practice bullaladingding in time for the 'World' series. By 'world' I do of course mean the grand total of 2 countries.

  21. SukiG says:

    Hey Dosanjh…don't dismiss the Canadians that quickly…there are lots of ex-Pat Brits and Europeans here that call it football as well as South Americans. I don't know who your cousin is or where they live or even why you had to teach them what "football" was, but almost everybody I know here plays football well into their 60s regardless of gender, religion or age. They don't even do that in England.

    We have more football from around the world than they even do there. My city, Vancouver is so cosmopolitan and yes we do have other sports that Canadians are passionate about i.e. ice hockey…so whilst I don't see Canada becoming some soccer/football powerhouse anytime soon I don't see England doing the reverse either.

    BTW the population is half of that of England (in a much larger), we have four major sports played professionally and Lacross is Canada's national game (by nativity) but Ice Hockey is in the official game of Canada. Not all sports fare well with spectators but we do have a lot to offer…and yes we do call it football because we are a nation of nations.

    And yes I am an ex-pat from Britain. Now for a real team that matters….Brazil!!!

  22. SukiG says:

    Hey Dosanjh…don't dismiss the Canadians that quickly…there are lots of ex-Pat Brits and Europeans here that call it football as well as South Americans. I don't know who your cousin is or where they live or even why you had to teach them what "football" was, but almost everybody I know here plays football well into their 60s regardless of gender, religion or age. They don't even do that in England.

    We have more football from around the world than they even do there. My city, Vancouver is so cosmopolitan and yes we do have other sports that Canadians are passionate about i.e. ice hockey…so whilst I don't see Canada becoming some soccer/football powerhouse anytime soon I don't see England doing the reverse either.

    BTW the population is half of that of England (in a much larger), we have four major sports played professionally and Lacross is Canada's national game (by nativity) but Ice Hockey is in the official game of Canada. Not all sports fare well with spectators but we do have a lot to offer…and yes we do call it football because we are a nation of nations.

    And yes I am an ex-pat from Britain. Now for a real team that matters….Brazil!!!

  23. Dosanjh says:

    Suki Ji….after the events on Sunday I'm a bit depressed and don't really wanna discuss football. Ever again.
    I take your point about Canada. I've no doubt it is a great country. I have a tremendous amount of close relatives out there and we keep in close contact. I don't however have any wish to visit. Maybe when I'm old…but now now while I'm still young. Because you see, no matter old great Canada may be in reality it has an image problem. It's problem is that it is like a small child with a sqeaky voice trying to make itself heard in a room full of big men. Seen as irrelevent nobody pays it any mind. I'll give you an example ; if you were to mention the word 'Canada' to the average white Englishmen or European, my experience has been that the majority of them think of 3 things :
    1) Ice2) Polar Bears3) French Canadian Montreal
    You would be hard pressed to find anyone even aware of any fairly large town in english speaking Canada.

  24. Dosanjh says:

    Also…You get a sense that Americans share similar dismissive views about Canada when you watch American shows. Obviously the thoughts in 'South Park' are exaggerated when they always show Canada has a backwater with one road, but behind the exaggerated humour there is the existence of a real thought.
    For the worldwide Sikh community I do think it is a bit of a problem…..particularly with Canada fast becoming the main centre for worldwide Sikhi. The problem is that a Sikh could become M.P…or even P.M of Canada and nobody in the world would ever know because nobody pays any attention to even the existence of Canada let alone what may or may not be happening there. In London or America however, a couple of Sikhs only need to sneeze and international media are reporting the story to the world. I do therefore, feel the existence of a very large Sikh population in Canada does absolutely nothing for worldwide Sikhi.

  25. Dosanjh says:

    Suki Ji….after the events on Sunday I'm a bit depressed and don't really wanna discuss football. Ever again.
    I take your point about Canada. I've no doubt it is a great country. I have a tremendous amount of close relatives out there and we keep in close contact. I don't however have any wish to visit. Maybe when I'm old…but now now while I'm still young. Because you see, no matter old great Canada may be in reality it has an image problem. It's problem is that it is like a small child with a sqeaky voice trying to make itself heard in a room full of big men. Seen as irrelevent nobody pays it any mind. I'll give you an example ; if you were to mention the word 'Canada' to the average white Englishmen or European, my experience has been that the majority of them think of 3 things :
    1) Ice2) Polar Bears3) French Canadian Montreal
    You would be hard pressed to find anyone even aware of any fairly large town in english speaking Canada.

  26. Dosanjh says:

    Also…You get a sense that Americans share similar dismissive views about Canada when you watch American shows. Obviously the thoughts in 'South Park' are exaggerated when they always show Canada has a backwater with one road, but behind the exaggerated humour there is the existence of a real thought.
    For the worldwide Sikh community I do think it is a bit of a problem…..particularly with Canada fast becoming the main centre for worldwide Sikhi. The problem is that a Sikh could become M.P…or even P.M of Canada and nobody in the world would ever know because nobody pays any attention to even the existence of Canada let alone what may or may not be happening there. In London or America however, a couple of Sikhs only need to sneeze and international media are reporting the story to the world. I do therefore, feel the existence of a very large Sikh population in Canada does absolutely nothing for worldwide Sikhi.

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