New Futures and ‘Insight into Sikhism’

For many of us Sikhs of Panjabi-background, those Sikhs that chose to embrace Sikhi (often termed as ‘goray Sikhs’, but by no means are all of them of such ‘gora’ background) are sometimes seen as an enigma. Too often stereotypes and easy labels such as ‘hippie’ or ‘weird’, knee-jerk opinions on ‘yoga’, or even a certain ‘guilt’ in terms of our own relationship with our Guru tend to be expressed in hushed tones. narayan.jpgHowever, such labels only dehumanize those that we should be most embracing as brothers and sisters of a shared Guru.

A recent article in a local Surrey newspaper recently has me re-thinking how as a Sikh community we can continue to strengthen our Qaum. Reading about Hari Nam Singh Khalsa’s own evolution was not only inspiring, but also a point for reflection.

The Oakville, Ontario resident is the host of the only English-language program on Canadian television that provides knowledge about Sikhi. His “Insight into Sikhism” airs on Saturday mornings throughout Canada (you can click here for Canadian times and channels). On the show’s website, the program’s purpose is described as:

Each week, host HariNam Singh Khalsa explains aspects of the Sikh religion and its relevance to modern day issues. Insight into Sikhism introduces the core principles of Sikhism in a simple and basic format in English for everyone to understand. HariNam Singhs mission is to spread the universal teachings of Sikhism to people of all faiths.[link]

Although I have never seen the show (if you have, please do comment and let us know your thoughts about it), it seems like a remarkable and much-needed project.

Describing his own evolution and how the program started, Har Nam Singh’s interview states:

For a restless young man whod been on a spiritual quest since he was a small child, there was something about the faith that spoke to him on a deeply personal level.

This is the religion I want he thought.

It took years of study.

He learned to read and speak Punjabi to study the scriptures in the original language.

His name was given him by a mentor shortly before he was baptized.

As a result of his studies, Khalsa became known for discussing principles of the faith in clear, simple terms.

That led to a career as an educator about Sikhism, which led to an unexpected career as a television host. [link]

However, the point of reflection I initially mentioned has to do with questions regarding the difference between our generation and our parents’ and the hope for greater interaction between these two sections of our commmunity. Sikhnet’s famed Gurumustuk Singh has been a sort of ambassador for many years. I wonder if in some ways as his own personal story closer parallels ours in that he was born of Sikh parents as opposed to himself making his own leap of faith (although by no means to suggest that he didn’t choose his own path) better helps Sikhs of Panjabi background connect to him (or it could be that he is just a really nice guy!).

In many locales the communities are separate due to geographic locations (I don’t know too many Sikhs of Panjabi backgrounds that live in Espaniola, but I am sure there are some!), but I have been pained to hear about locales such as Phoenix where the divisions run much deeper. So my point for reflection is that in the upcoming generation, especially that of Gurumustuk’s son Narayan Singh, etc., will we see greater overlap and connection in our community. Muslims have been far more successful than us (although by no means am I trying to suggest they don’t have their own hierarchies) in becoming a much more ecumenical religion (while it is true that they have had a much longer history and contacts to do so!) As the children of immigrants in subsequent generations will continue to lose their Panjabi language, will we be able to learn and connect with our brothers/sisters of the faith that are creating new and innovative paths (such as Sikhnet.com and the program “Insight into Sikhism”) to keep their Sikhi?

Rules of this conversation, this post is NOT the place to talk about Yogi Bhajan Singh or yoga. Maybe we’ll have those discussions later (we’ll see), but this is NOT the place and those types of comments will be deleted. Ok, now go ahead!


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20 Responses to “New Futures and ‘Insight into Sikhism’”

  1. I think there is much work to be done to build bridges of understanding and we all have to do our part (thank you for starting this dialog :). Much of the division is the result of mis-understanding and lack of openness to try to understand the other side. The pre-judgements create a wall and prevent more rapid interaction.

    I have found that my generation who were born and raised Sikhs (of western/non-punjabi parents) are better able to connect with Sikhs of punjabi origin. There is much more in common and it is not such a drastic cultural difference. Many of the youth such as myself went to school in India so have a strong connection to Punjabi/India/etc and feel like it is our second home. We can relate to the culture and people, unlike our parents who have had much less of this interaction.

    I have found that the further the generations go…the smaller the differences become. Basically, the "elder generations" have a much harder time relating with each other. They both come from more drastically different "worlds" and backgrounds. However, my generation and my children's generation is so much closer so it is easier to relate. I find it similar to how so many people in the 1960s in America were prejudice towards black people. It was a state of mind that was spread out intolerance. However in time and many generations people become more educated and this type of automatic thinking has changed.

    In the same way as we all interact more and learn about each other we will be able to get rid of the stereotypes and see each other for who we are as Sikhs of the Guru and Khalsa brothers and sisters. What is key is that we be tolerant and understanding and not get stuck in the judgment game which only serves to divide, rather than unite.

  2. I think there is much work to be done to build bridges of understanding and we all have to do our part (thank you for starting this dialog :). Much of the division is the result of mis-understanding and lack of openness to try to understand the other side. The pre-judgements create a wall and prevent more rapid interaction.

    I have found that my generation who were born and raised Sikhs (of western/non-punjabi parents) are better able to connect with Sikhs of punjabi origin. There is much more in common and it is not such a drastic cultural difference. Many of the youth such as myself went to school in India so have a strong connection to Punjabi/India/etc and feel like it is our second home. We can relate to the culture and people, unlike our parents who have had much less of this interaction.

    I have found that the further the generations go…the smaller the differences become. Basically, the “elder generations” have a much harder time relating with each other. They both come from more drastically different “worlds” and backgrounds. However, my generation and my children’s generation is so much closer so it is easier to relate. I find it similar to how so many people in the 1960s in America were prejudice towards black people. It was a state of mind that was spread out intolerance. However in time and many generations people become more educated and this type of automatic thinking has changed.

    In the same way as we all interact more and learn about each other we will be able to get rid of the stereotypes and see each other for who we are as Sikhs of the Guru and Khalsa brothers and sisters. What is key is that we be tolerant and understanding and not get stuck in the judgment game which only serves to divide, rather than unite.

  3. For the record, Gurumustuk Singh Ji, is "a really nice guy." As far as integration, I think people need to just decide if being a Sikh is their prime motivating factor for living or not. If being a Sikh is really important to someone, then certainly with very little effort they will understand the basic meaning of "Ek Ong Kaar."

    When I was a kid the first thing my parents taught me about being a Sikh was that we treat all humans equally and we live to serve God in all. We see God in all and respect that all is part of the one (Ek Ong Kar). It is the most basic principle and seemingly difficult for so many. People just want to divide and categorize and manipulate and take possesion of things/people/beliefs.

    Although I didn't grow up or go to school in India, I've become very familiar with Punjabi culture (at least the modern culture) and have met and interacted with thousands of Punjabi people. I enjoy the culture and have picked up certain cultural influences and tastes. This has made it easy for me to interact with Sikhs of Punjabi descent. Likewise I enjoy and understand some Latin American cultures and am able to interact with and enjoy the company of Latin American Sikhs. It is important to be open and aware of other people's cultures. Difficulty seems to arise when people can't understand or accept other people's differences. People think they own "Sikhi" and that they have the right to enforce their interpretations and beliefs on others. Or they just can't understand something beyond their narrow view.

    I remember a guy I met in Goindwal Sahib on my first trip to India when I was 21. He had a turban and a trimmed beard, and looked a little like he was drinking – not what I would consider an "ideal" Sikh. There was a kirtan program inside the Gurdwara which was full and a tent outside the Gurdwara for the overflow of people. While sitting there with my brother, both of us wearing the bana of Guru Gobind Singh with uncut hair. Not just dressed as Sikhs, but clearly both Sikhs. This guy started talking to us. He asked where we were from, he understood US, but when he asked where he was confused by "New Mexico." He said his brother lived in Skramento. Anyway, at some point he said "So…you are Christians?" I don't remember exactly what I told him, just that I was CLEARLY a SIKH!! and not somebody who drinks or cuts his hair, though I didn't say that to him. I just remember that it was one of the most offensive things that I will remember into perpetuity. It really upset me and still does. It was just so unconscious and unaware and disgusting the way he behaved. I know it was just some guy being stupid, but for a Sikh to not even recognize another Sikh, especially one who dresses like our beloved father Guru Gobind Singh, I just could not forget such a lack of awareness from a supposed Sikh. With what I was taught as a child and believed most of my life, I still have such a hard time trying to accept that most Sikhs are not the saint soldiers that I thought they were and who I met as a kid and stil live with and whose historic stories live in my heart. Luckily my belief in "Ek Ong Kar" or the oneness of all, can still allow me to move beyond my expectations and accept that other people, Sikh or not, are my equals and deserve to be treated as God.

    I think all Sikhs will be well off if we can just remember:

    Nanak Naam Chardi Kala Tayray Banay Sarbat Da Bhala.

  4. For the record, Gurumustuk Singh Ji, is “a really nice guy.” As far as integration, I think people need to just decide if being a Sikh is their prime motivating factor for living or not. If being a Sikh is really important to someone, then certainly with very little effort they will understand the basic meaning of “Ek Ong Kaar.”
    When I was a kid the first thing my parents taught me about being a Sikh was that we treat all humans equally and we live to serve God in all. We see God in all and respect that all is part of the one (Ek Ong Kar). It is the most basic principle and seemingly difficult for so many. People just want to divide and categorize and manipulate and take possesion of things/people/beliefs.
    Although I didn’t grow up or go to school in India, I’ve become very familiar with Punjabi culture (at least the modern culture) and have met and interacted with thousands of Punjabi people. I enjoy the culture and have picked up certain cultural influences and tastes. This has made it easy for me to interact with Sikhs of Punjabi descent. Likewise I enjoy and understand some Latin American cultures and am able to interact with and enjoy the company of Latin American Sikhs. It is important to be open and aware of other people’s cultures. Difficulty seems to arise when people can’t understand or accept other people’s differences. People think they own “Sikhi” and that they have the right to enforce their interpretations and beliefs on others. Or they just can’t understand something beyond their narrow view.
    I remember a guy I met in Goindwal Sahib on my first trip to India when I was 21. He had a turban and a trimmed beard, and looked a little like he was drinking – not what I would consider an “ideal” Sikh. There was a kirtan program inside the Gurdwara which was full and a tent outside the Gurdwara for the overflow of people. While sitting there with my brother, both of us wearing the bana of Guru Gobind Singh with uncut hair. Not just dressed as Sikhs, but clearly both Sikhs. This guy started talking to us. He asked where we were from, he understood US, but when he asked where he was confused by “New Mexico.” He said his brother lived in Skramento. Anyway, at some point he said “So…you are Christians?” I don’t remember exactly what I told him, just that I was CLEARLY a SIKH!! and not somebody who drinks or cuts his hair, though I didn’t say that to him. I just remember that it was one of the most offensive things that I will remember into perpetuity. It really upset me and still does. It was just so unconscious and unaware and disgusting the way he behaved. I know it was just some guy being stupid, but for a Sikh to not even recognize another Sikh, especially one who dresses like our beloved father Guru Gobind Singh, I just could not forget such a lack of awareness from a supposed Sikh. With what I was taught as a child and believed most of my life, I still have such a hard time trying to accept that most Sikhs are not the saint soldiers that I thought they were and who I met as a kid and stil live with and whose historic stories live in my heart. Luckily my belief in “Ek Ong Kar” or the oneness of all, can still allow me to move beyond my expectations and accept that other people, Sikh or not, are my equals and deserve to be treated as God.
    I think all Sikhs will be well off if we can just remember:
    Nanak Naam Chardi Kala Tayray Banay Sarbat Da Bhala.

  5. Singh says:

    [I appreciate your restraint, but the movement is still away from the topic of this discussion. Singh, you are right, no group has a monopoly on bringing new ideas into the Qaum. That being said, the conversation here is on those ideas and bridging the gap.

    I agree with your statement that "White Sikhs as Sikhs, with all their virtues or vices, is just as important as our (numerous) discussions about Punjabi Sikhs." Maybe someone like Gurumustuk can open our eyes to problems within this section of our community as well, e.g. retention over the years, etc.

    However, you have received an open invitation by Gurumustuk to talk about the various issues you raise. Hopefully he can satisfy you or hopefully you will continue to seek answers to your questions.

    For the issues you wish to discuss there is plenty of open space on the internet. However, this thread is not to be hijacked or taken off topic…..Admin Singh]

  6. First off, "Singh" why can't you write your real name and take ownership for your comments? Too often people feel like the anonymity of the internet gives them the right to say whatever they want without taking responsibility or ownership for their words. I like to use the rule when typing something online that, "would I say this to someone if I were talking to them face to face?". If the answer is no…then it is not appropriate to say.

    Anyways, the issues you are bringing up are total mis-information from a certain website whose sole purpose is to spread hate and criticize 3HO/Yogi Bhajan. It is in NO WAY an objective source of information. Just because someone posts something online doesn't make it true. In America the rule of law is innocent until proven guilty. All these so called accusations are just that, accusations, and hold little water. If YOU honestly want to learn and get the answers to these questions then talk to someone face to face. I would rather not start a point by point debate/QA on this. Feel free to call me up at the SikhNet office and I will do my best to answer your questions.

    All of us here are trying to make positive changes and efforts to work together and get to know each other. No one is claiming to be better than the other. All I ask is that you don't pre-judge me or anyone else. Sikhs above all should be compassionate and understanding. It is not the Sikh way to judge others, and I hope that you will take the time to get to know some of your Sikh brothers and sisters who you are referring to and not generalize us into "3HO" or some other container. We are Sikhs of the Guru, period. Until we can focus on the commonality in each other little progress will be made in having a unified panth.

  7. Singh says:

    [I appreciate your restraint, but the movement is still away from the topic of this discussion. Singh, you are right, no group has a monopoly on bringing new ideas into the Qaum. That being said, the conversation here is on those ideas and bridging the gap.

    I agree with your statement that “White Sikhs as Sikhs, with all their virtues or vices, is just as important as our (numerous) discussions about Punjabi Sikhs.” Maybe someone like Gurumustuk can open our eyes to problems within this section of our community as well, e.g. retention over the years, etc.

    However, you have received an open invitation by Gurumustuk to talk about the various issues you raise. Hopefully he can satisfy you or hopefully you will continue to seek answers to your questions.

    For the issues you wish to discuss there is plenty of open space on the internet. However, this thread is not to be hijacked or taken off topic…..Admin Singh]

  8. First off, “Singh” why can’t you write your real name and take ownership for your comments? Too often people feel like the anonymity of the internet gives them the right to say whatever they want without taking responsibility or ownership for their words. I like to use the rule when typing something online that, “would I say this to someone if I were talking to them face to face?”. If the answer is no…then it is not appropriate to say.

    Anyways, the issues you are bringing up are total mis-information from a certain website whose sole purpose is to spread hate and criticize 3HO/Yogi Bhajan. It is in NO WAY an objective source of information. Just because someone posts something online doesn’t make it true. In America the rule of law is innocent until proven guilty. All these so called accusations are just that, accusations, and hold little water. If YOU honestly want to learn and get the answers to these questions then talk to someone face to face. I would rather not start a point by point debate/QA on this. Feel free to call me up at the SikhNet office and I will do my best to answer your questions.

    All of us here are trying to make positive changes and efforts to work together and get to know each other. No one is claiming to be better than the other. All I ask is that you don’t pre-judge me or anyone else. Sikhs above all should be compassionate and understanding. It is not the Sikh way to judge others, and I hope that you will take the time to get to know some of your Sikh brothers and sisters who you are referring to and not generalize us into “3HO” or some other container. We are Sikhs of the Guru, period. Until we can focus on the commonality in each other little progress will be made in having a unified panth.

  9. kaptaan says:

    I have to say that I have been to Espanola, NM and seen first hand the manner in which the Sangat there worships as Sikhs. I went with an open mind but also with my guard up against anything that I might find "non-Sikh". I have to say going there was one of the most uplifting and satisfying experiences I've had. Being with the non-Punjabi Sikhs was inspirational for me. I loved the kirtan and the way in which they worship.

    People who criticize without knowing or trying to find out the facts are being foolish. I'd like to see jathas of Sikhs from across the world and especially from across Canada and the US make the trek to Espanola and participate and worship with the Sangat there to see how they do things and to dispel any lies or delusions people have about them. The Sangat there is doing more for the Panth than I think people give them credit. The Panth is a thousand times better for having that Sangat taking a prominent position in the Panth. May Waheguru Ji bless them and the Khalsa always.

  10. kaptaan says:

    Just to be clear I don't believe in divisions amongst Sikhs such as Punjabi or non-Punjabi, and only used those terms as ethnic descriptors. As far as I'm concerned a Sikh is a Sikh and the Khalsa in Espanola are as much the Guru's children as any other Khalsa. Punjabis do NOT have any special status amongst the Khalsa or in the Panth versus non-Punjabis. Racism, casteism, and ethno-nationalism have no place amongst Sikhs.

    regards,

    Kaptaan

  11. kaptaan says:

    I have to say that I have been to Espanola, NM and seen first hand the manner in which the Sangat there worships as Sikhs. I went with an open mind but also with my guard up against anything that I might find “non-Sikh”. I have to say going there was one of the most uplifting and satisfying experiences I’ve had. Being with the non-Punjabi Sikhs was inspirational for me. I loved the kirtan and the way in which they worship.

    People who criticize without knowing or trying to find out the facts are being foolish. I’d like to see jathas of Sikhs from across the world and especially from across Canada and the US make the trek to Espanola and participate and worship with the Sangat there to see how they do things and to dispel any lies or delusions people have about them. The Sangat there is doing more for the Panth than I think people give them credit. The Panth is a thousand times better for having that Sangat taking a prominent position in the Panth. May Waheguru Ji bless them and the Khalsa always.

  12. kaptaan says:

    Just to be clear I don’t believe in divisions amongst Sikhs such as Punjabi or non-Punjabi, and only used those terms as ethnic descriptors. As far as I’m concerned a Sikh is a Sikh and the Khalsa in Espanola are as much the Guru’s children as any other Khalsa. Punjabis do NOT have any special status amongst the Khalsa or in the Panth versus non-Punjabis. Racism, casteism, and ethno-nationalism have no place amongst Sikhs.

    regards,
    Kaptaan

  13. Mohinder Singh Bains says:

    To introduce myself, I immigrated from Punjab at age 25 to Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, where I have been living and working since October, 1972. I am a former Alberta school teacher, realtor, appraiser, assessor, and Motel owner/operator. Currently I am self-employed, working on a project to develop Hampton Hotel by Hilton Hotels. Though I was born and raised in Punjab, yet I din't learn much about Sikhism though I attended a Khalsa High School, and had Masters degree in Pol. Sc. from Punjab University. We Punjabis take it for granted that we are true sikhs, actually we are not because we lack proper knowledge, and understanding, what it means to be true sikh. In Punjab the Sikhism is going down because there are not many true practising sikhs, who can understand true meaning of Gurbani,and practice the way prescribed by the ten Gurus, various Bhagats, and incorporate those principles into our daily lives. At present, very few people wear turbans, and uncut hair; rather they drink a lot plus all kinds of drugs have crept into people's lives, which is unfortunate. I agree with the above writer, Sikhi is not the monopoly of Punjabis, who have abandoned it to a large extent, and still claim it as their birthright to be known as Sikhs. To me Sikhi means Ek Onkar, which means One-ness of Universe, One God, the Creator, the Only Truth, Unafraid, impartial, enemy of none, constant beyond time, unborn, self-existent to be realized with the grace of a Spiritual Guide. From this stems, Fatherhood of One Almighty Waheguru (God, equality and universal brotherhood of all His children, fearlessness, justice, permanence of Him as a spirit pervading in all His creation, and beyond. No room for distinctions of races, nationalities, colors, creeds, places of origin, males,castes, females. I have come to believe that such enlightenment about the fundamentals of Sikhism among the present and future generations of His children around the Globe will create truly universal brotherhood of all humans; that is why Sikhism is truly a Universal faith. We are very lucky, with Gurus grace our brothers in the West are making efforts to read, understand, and practice Sikhi; and we Punjabis should learn from them. Future generations of Punjabis will most likely benefit from the Western practicing Sikhs because it will be easier for the children born in western countries to understand the language. When I see a Sikh from the West, who delibrately adopted this faith with Gurus grace, I feel great. I have seen them at Anadpur Sahib, Harimandir Sahib, and various other Historical Sikh Shrines, keeping full-from of uncut hair, and dressed in Kurta/Pyjams, jackets, and turbans. I admire Guru Gobind Singh's vision for the whole Universe. I am very optimistic that the mankind will progress and prosper in a peaceful co-existence when more people will learn and practice the principles enshrined in the Sikh Scripture, Guru Granth Sahib. SARBAT DA BHALA in the name of Guru Nanak. Wahe Guru Ji Ka Khalsa, Wahe Guru Ji Ki Fateh.

  14. Mohinder Singh Bains says:

    To introduce myself, I immigrated from Punjab at age 25 to Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, where I have been living and working since October, 1972. I am a former Alberta school teacher, realtor, appraiser, assessor, and Motel owner/operator. Currently I am self-employed, working on a project to develop Hampton Hotel by Hilton Hotels. Though I was born and raised in Punjab, yet I din’t learn much about Sikhism though I attended a Khalsa High School, and had Masters degree in Pol. Sc. from Punjab University. We Punjabis take it for granted that we are true sikhs, actually we are not because we lack proper knowledge, and understanding, what it means to be true sikh. In Punjab the Sikhism is going down because there are not many true practising sikhs, who can understand true meaning of Gurbani,and practice the way prescribed by the ten Gurus, various Bhagats, and incorporate those principles into our daily lives. At present, very few people wear turbans, and uncut hair; rather they drink a lot plus all kinds of drugs have crept into people’s lives, which is unfortunate. I agree with the above writer, Sikhi is not the monopoly of Punjabis, who have abandoned it to a large extent, and still claim it as their birthright to be known as Sikhs. To me Sikhi means Ek Onkar, which means One-ness of Universe, One God, the Creator, the Only Truth, Unafraid, impartial, enemy of none, constant beyond time, unborn, self-existent to be realized with the grace of a Spiritual Guide. From this stems, Fatherhood of One Almighty Waheguru (God, equality and universal brotherhood of all His children, fearlessness, justice, permanence of Him as a spirit pervading in all His creation, and beyond. No room for distinctions of races, nationalities, colors, creeds, places of origin, males,castes, females. I have come to believe that such enlightenment about the fundamentals of Sikhism among the present and future generations of His children around the Globe will create truly universal brotherhood of all humans; that is why Sikhism is truly a Universal faith. We are very lucky, with Gurus grace our brothers in the West are making efforts to read, understand, and practice Sikhi; and we Punjabis should learn from them. Future generations of Punjabis will most likely benefit from the Western practicing Sikhs because it will be easier for the children born in western countries to understand the language. When I see a Sikh from the West, who delibrately adopted this faith with Gurus grace, I feel great. I have seen them at Anadpur Sahib, Harimandir Sahib, and various other Historical Sikh Shrines, keeping full-from of uncut hair, and dressed in Kurta/Pyjams, jackets, and turbans. I admire Guru Gobind Singh’s vision for the whole Universe. I am very optimistic that the mankind will progress and prosper in a peaceful co-existence when more people will learn and practice the principles enshrined in the Sikh Scripture, Guru Granth Sahib. SARBAT DA BHALA in the name of Guru Nanak. Wahe Guru Ji Ka Khalsa, Wahe Guru Ji Ki Fateh.

  15. Mohinder Singh Bains says:

    "NANAK SE NAR ASAL KHAR, JO BIN GUN GARBH KRANT," meaning: those humans are in deed donkeys, who display their egoistic pride without having any virtues. Guru Nanak preached, "Mithat Neveen Nanaka, Gun Changyan Tat." meaning humility is the essence of all virtues. At His attempted initiation ceremony to Hinduism, Nanak says, "Daya Kapah, Santokh Sout, Jat Gandhee, Sat Vat; Eh Janeyou Jee Ka Hai Ta Pandhe Ghat; Na Eh Tuteh, Na Mal Lageh, Na Eh Jalai Na Jaye, Dhan Se Manas Nanaka, Jo Gal Chaley Pai," meaning: From the cotton of KINDNESS, draw the thread of CONTENTMENT, put knots of LUST CONTROL, and twist it with TRUTH, that will make a true INITIATION THREAD worthy for me to wear. Baptismal thread thus made will neither break, nor get soiled, nor burn, nor disappear. Great are those who wear such true Janeyou. Similarly Nanak says,"Mehar Maseet, Sidak Mussalah, Hakk Halaal Quran, Saram Sunatt, Santokh Roza, Hoh Musalmaan," meaning: Mosque of KINDNESS, prayer mat of FAITH, reading of Quran(scripture)HONEST EARNINGS, labour or service thy CIRCUMCISION,and CONTENTMENT IN ALAH's WILL, only then you become a Muslim. Guru Nanak rejected all initiating rituals as useless, be it muslims, sikhs, hindus, or christians; truly initiated religious human is the one who practices virtues which are same for all humans. Mere distinctions of Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, Christians, do harm than good for humanity, unless we tread the path of virtues and become good humans. That is why Guru Nanak Says: Na Ham Hindu, Na Musalman." Becoming either is meaningless, becoming GOOD HUMANS is only path prescribed by Nanak. Nanak is not afraid to equate those humans to donkeys, who pride themselves egoistically without practicing any virtues.

  16. Mohinder Singh Bains says:

    “NANAK SE NAR ASAL KHAR, JO BIN GUN GARBH KRANT,” meaning: those humans are in deed donkeys, who display their egoistic pride without having any virtues. Guru Nanak preached, “Mithat Neveen Nanaka, Gun Changyan Tat.” meaning humility is the essence of all virtues. At His attempted initiation ceremony to Hinduism, Nanak says, “Daya Kapah, Santokh Sout, Jat Gandhee, Sat Vat; Eh Janeyou Jee Ka Hai Ta Pandhe Ghat; Na Eh Tuteh, Na Mal Lageh, Na Eh Jalai Na Jaye, Dhan Se Manas Nanaka, Jo Gal Chaley Pai,” meaning: From the cotton of KINDNESS, draw the thread of CONTENTMENT, put knots of LUST CONTROL, and twist it with TRUTH, that will make a true INITIATION THREAD worthy for me to wear. Baptismal thread thus made will neither break, nor get soiled, nor burn, nor disappear. Great are those who wear such true Janeyou. Similarly Nanak says,”Mehar Maseet, Sidak Mussalah, Hakk Halaal Quran, Saram Sunatt, Santokh Roza, Hoh Musalmaan,” meaning: Mosque of KINDNESS, prayer mat of FAITH, reading of Quran(scripture)HONEST EARNINGS, labour or service thy CIRCUMCISION,and CONTENTMENT IN ALAH’s WILL, only then you become a Muslim. Guru Nanak rejected all initiating rituals as useless, be it muslims, sikhs, hindus, or christians; truly initiated religious human is the one who practices virtues which are same for all humans. Mere distinctions of Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, Christians, do harm than good for humanity, unless we tread the path of virtues and become good humans. That is why Guru Nanak Says: Na Ham Hindu, Na Musalman.” Becoming either is meaningless, becoming GOOD HUMANS is only path prescribed by Nanak. Nanak is not afraid to equate those humans to donkeys, who pride themselves egoistically without practicing any virtues.

  17. Mohinder Bains says:

    PANJ NAMAZAN, WAQT PANJ, PANJA PANJEY NAON,

    PEHLA SACH, HALAL DOYE, TEEJEE KHAIR KHUDAYE,

    CHAUTHI NEEYAT RAAS MAN, PANVEEN SIFAT SUNAYE,

    KARNHI KAABA SAAJ KE, MUSALMAN SADAYE (Guru Nanak)

    The first words uttered by Guru Nanak upon enlightenment were "NA KO HINDU, NA MUSALMAN." Muslims objected to it, and the Kazis said they do Namas five times a day, and go for Hajj as prescribed by Islam, how can you say that we are not MUSALMAN. They took Guru Nanak to the mosque to prove the fact that they do Namaz, and they asked Guru Nanak, if he ever did Namaz? Guru Nanak said Yes he does namaz, but the Kazi, and the Nawab did not because Kazi Sahib were worried about the colt falling in the well, and Nawab Sahib were buying horses in Kabul while physically doing the ritual of Namaz in the mosque. Both were surprized at Guru Nanak's intuition, and they confessed their inner state of mind as such while performing Namaz. Guru Nanak explained the proper way of doing Namaz in the above Sermon, meaning as follows:

    According to Islam, all muslims should pray five times which is known as Namaz. First Namaz means they must be truthful, second Namaz means they should earn their living with honest means, and the third Namaz means they must wish all humans well, the fourth Namaz means they should clean their mind or act according to their consciousness(inner voice of soul), and the fifth Namaz means they should always praise the Allah. They must practice good deeds which is equal to going for a Hajj, only then they may call themselves as Muslims. Failing this No one is Musalman.

  18. PANJ NAMAZAN, WAQT PANJ, PANJA PANJEY NAON,
    PEHLA SACH, HALAL DOYE, TEEJEE KHAIR KHUDAYE,
    CHAUTHI NEEYAT RAAS MAN, PANVEEN SIFAT SUNAYE,
    KARNHI KAABA SAAJ KE, MUSALMAN SADAYE (Guru Nanak)

    The first words uttered by Guru Nanak upon enlightenment were “NA KO HINDU, NA MUSALMAN.” Muslims objected to it, and the Kazis said they do Namas five times a day, and go for Hajj as prescribed by Islam, how can you say that we are not MUSALMAN. They took Guru Nanak to the mosque to prove the fact that they do Namaz, and they asked Guru Nanak, if he ever did Namaz? Guru Nanak said Yes he does namaz, but the Kazi, and the Nawab did not because Kazi Sahib were worried about the colt falling in the well, and Nawab Sahib were buying horses in Kabul while physically doing the ritual of Namaz in the mosque. Both were surprized at Guru Nanak’s intuition, and they confessed their inner state of mind as such while performing Namaz. Guru Nanak explained the proper way of doing Namaz in the above Sermon, meaning as follows:

    According to Islam, all muslims should pray five times which is known as Namaz. First Namaz means they must be truthful, second Namaz means they should earn their living with honest means, and the third Namaz means they must wish all humans well, the fourth Namaz means they should clean their mind or act according to their consciousness(inner voice of soul), and the fifth Namaz means they should always praise the Allah. They must practice good deeds which is equal to going for a Hajj, only then they may call themselves as Muslims. Failing this No one is Musalman.

  19. grd says:

    harinam singh khalsa of Insight into sikhism is a womaniser.__every week he don't explain anything new , just general views to believe in god. people only listen because of his voice. and who so ever is listening earlier now stops. now they know how really he is, cheater, characterless, any many other bad words for him.

  20. grd says:

    harinam singh khalsa of Insight into sikhism is a womaniser.__every week he don't explain anything new , just general views to believe in god. people only listen because of his voice. and who so ever is listening earlier now stops. now they know how really he is, cheater, characterless, any many other bad words for him.