Langar Hall Kaneda

As a young kid, the langar hall was my favourite space in our local Gurdwara. Located in the basement of the building, it was a home away from home. My parents helped build the Gurdwara in the 1970s and I spent many weekends helping with the preparation of Sunday morning langar. I occasionally helped with the cooking, often with the serving and always with the running around. The wide open empty space in the hall provided many hours of fun with playing tag and football with a ball made of tied-up ramaals (handkerchiefs). It was a place to hang out with kids that looked like me and who were going through the same things as me.

As I moved through my late-teens and what I affectionately call my “hard-core” phase, I saw the langar hall as a place serving only two specific functions; serving meals and eating meals (on the floor). Idle social conversation wasn’t what you were going to Gurdwara for. You could do that during the famous multi-family dinner parties that all Punjabi parents dragged their kids to. Gurdwaras were for serious matters and all these people sitting around and gossiping were just taking up valuable time space. Thankfully, I lightened up.

Fast forward a decade (or two) and now, I’ve reconciled my past. Growing up, while I was hanging with other kids who called “jooda time-outs”, the adults were also drinking chaa, talking and sharing stories with other adults. Through the universal acts of serving a meal and sharing a meal, the langar hall became a hub for my local Sikh community.

I’ve seen many an animated conversation in a langar hall. I’ve seen people talk with passion about faith, family, politics, business, sports. In fact, aside from the langar hall, our community has few other forums that provide for all walks of life to come together and share their ideas.

That is why I love that the Langar Hall has gone online. In the same spirit of my community Gurdwara, this site brings together ordinary Sikhs to talk about the issues of the day. The only difference here is that you have to supply your own chaa and mutheai (how the heck do you write that in English? Its worse than paranthas).

I’ve been asked to take on the seva of contributing to this great project. I do not have an English degree from a fancy American university like my illustrious colleagues, in fact I probably should have taken up my Grade One teacher’s offer of English as a Second Language classes. Regardless, I will promise to add another voice to the conversation. Not one that is highly educated or representative of all Sikh-Canadians but one of a second generation Sikh-Canadian born and raised in a country he loves as his own.

Let the gup-shup begin!


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13 Responses to “Langar Hall Kaneda”

  1. saihaj says:

    Welcome! Looking forward to you Maple Leaf perspective.

  2. saihaj says:

    Welcome! Looking forward to you Maple Leaf perspective.

  3. Welcome to the Langarhall :) Glad to see the maple leafs branch out…

  4. Welcome to the Langarhall :) Glad to see the maple leafs branch out…

  5. Mewa Singh says:

    We made footballs out of foil (much to the dismay of our mothers!)

  6. Mewa Singh says:

    We made footballs out of foil (much to the dismay of our mothers!)

  7. wayne gretzky says:

    KHALISTAN JINDABAD.

    Great move. I find that the American Sikh voice is not representative of community issues above the 49th parallel. We need more of Canadian voice on this blog as it is also more representative of Sikh issues.

    KHALISTAN JINDABAD.

  8. wayne gretzky says:

    KHALISTAN JINDABAD.

    Great move. I find that the American Sikh voice is not representative of community issues above the 49th parallel. We need more of Canadian voice on this blog as it is also more representative of Sikh issues.


    KHALISTAN JINDABAD.

  9. Reema says:

    WG-

    That's an interesting perspective- the Canadian voice is more representative of Sikh issues? What makes you feel that way? Or let me guess- because our discussions haven't been dominated by talk of Khalistan, they're not Sikh enough?

    Sorry, I'd have to disagree. No one Sikh community's issues are more or less Sikh. The community is a lot more diverse than you realize. Sure we haven't had much discussion of Canadian Sikh issues, but I don't think that's what you were saying…

  10. Reema says:

    WG-

    That’s an interesting perspective- the Canadian voice is more representative of Sikh issues? What makes you feel that way? Or let me guess- because our discussions haven’t been dominated by talk of Khalistan, they’re not Sikh enough?

    Sorry, I’d have to disagree. No one Sikh community’s issues are more or less Sikh. The community is a lot more diverse than you realize. Sure we haven’t had much discussion of Canadian Sikh issues, but I don’t think that’s what you were saying…

  11. bdb says:

    Gretzky is clearly enamored by sports figures etc which speaks a lot about him. He is likely not a Sikh and if he is, he is one of those who would rather now split the Sikh quaum based on American/Canadian heritage-as if we haven't been torn apart by others enough.

    He lives in a democracy but craves a theocracy-enough said.

  12. bdb says:

    Gretzky is clearly enamored by sports figures etc which speaks a lot about him. He is likely not a Sikh and if he is, he is one of those who would rather now split the Sikh quaum based on American/Canadian heritage-as if we haven’t been torn apart by others enough.
    He lives in a democracy but craves a theocracy-enough said.

  13. clіck here says:

    Process of education is very necessary and difficult. The complicated nature of the studies has made the learning very analytical and critical. The knowledge is produced and analyzed for the success and triumph.