Bollywood’s “Heroes” – More Sikh Characters on the Big Screen

We have had a lot of discussion about the Sikh identity here on TLH, so it is no surprise that when I saw this movie poster I immediately wanted to bring it to your attention.

heroes_turban.jpgBollywood is doing it again another movie with Sikhs. But instead of what we have seen in the past with Sikhs often portrayed as unflattering villains and goofballs, it seems that the trend now is to cast people in Sikhs roles where the Sikhs are the heroes. I suppose it is partly in that spirit that the movie is called Heroes.

Heroes is about two friends who journey through India meeting everyday heroes, at least one of whom is a Sikh. But that is not the part that interested me of course. The interesting part is not the story line, but all of the press that Salman Khan (the actor who plays a Sikh hero) has gotten for his attempt to play a real Sikh.

Salman Khan [is] seen in a Sikh makeover for the first time ever and he makes a good looking jatt Sikh with a beautifully tied turban. He grew his beard for three weeks before the filming for an authentic bearded Sikh look. Source.

I think this is probably the first time that I have heard this happening. Although, I think actor Sunny Deol may have grown his own beard for a couple of his roles as a Sikh it has never been so explicitly commended or publicized. Im not sure how I come down on this, but all the press does point to a deliberate effort by Bollywood to NOT-offend Sikhs, which I think is a positive move on the film industries part.

Further:

[T]o keep the authenticity of the character he grew his beard and followed some important elements of that religion. Well what surprised us most that a chain smoker like Salman decided to refrain from smoking whenever he was in his Sikh getup.

It is believed that Salman didnt smoke during the shoot of his film. What made him do that? We asked Vikas Kapoor manager of Salman Khan who is also the producer of Heroes. He replied, Salman respects all religion and follows them religiously. He knew that Sikhs generally dont smoke as they are prohibited by their religion. Thus taking that into consideration Salman decided not to smoke during the shoot of this film.

He also informs that though he is a chain smoker, he never smoked when he was in his turban get up. I remember sometimes he used to spend 10 hours in the same get up but didnt smoke at all. Salman did it out of respect for the Sikh religion. Apart from his attire, Salman also grew his beard to make his get up look real. His respect for the turban made him stay away from cigarettes. says Vikas. Source.

I respect Salman Khan for his attempt to respect Sikhs and I think it seems genuine that he is trying to be a good keeper of the Sikh identity at least for the short period that he actually looks/looked like a Sikh.

However, there is definitely some concern with the way the dastar/turban has been used in Bollywood as of late. It seems that the turban has become a fad in the film industry. One website called the recent love of turbans the T-Factor, stating:

It did the magic for Sunny Deol in films like Gadar-Ek Prem Katha and Jo Bole So Nihaal and it has done it again for Khiladi Kumar in Singh is Kinng. Talking about the T-factor, turban is in for Bollywood stars these days.

Now that they have realized that the pagdi could lead their way to success, Salman Khan will be seen with it in Samir Karniks multi-starrer Heroes… Source.

I dont know how I feel about the movie, but the media surrounding it and the way the turban has been marketed do raise some questions. But with all of the attention I wonder why Bollywood still hasn’t casted a real, live, practicing Sikh as a Sikh…

——

The movie trailer can be viewed here on Youtube.

You can also read about our discussion about the movie Singh is Kinng here and about the commodification of the Sikh identity, with the introduction of the Kenneth Cole ad featuring a Sikh model, here.


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39 Responses to “Bollywood’s “Heroes” – More Sikh Characters on the Big Screen”

  1. Sundari says:

    You can add one more to the list. Saif Ali Khan is also shooting a film where he plays a sardar.

  2. Sundari says:

    You can add one more to the list. Saif Ali Khan is also shooting a film where he plays a sardar.

  3. Jay says:

    You could add one more on top of Saif, as I believe Ranbir Kapoor will be donning a turban(although that's more than a year away).

    I'm kind of mixed about this issue. I don't really think it's a fad though, since there were turbaned heroes in the past. I think we are seeing more now, because most actors want a different look for every film instead of showing up in the same get-up film after film like they did in the past. That's why we have seen some real physical transformations like Saif Ali Khan in Omkara(yellowed his teeth, buzzed his hair, etc), Abhishek Bachchan in Guru (gained 30 lbs to age himself), Aamir Khan in Mangal Panday (grew out his hair and moustache), etc.

  4. Jay says:

    You could add one more on top of Saif, as I believe Ranbir Kapoor will be donning a turban(although that’s more than a year away).

    I’m kind of mixed about this issue. I don’t really think it’s a fad though, since there were turbaned heroes in the past. I think we are seeing more now, because most actors want a different look for every film instead of showing up in the same get-up film after film like they did in the past. That’s why we have seen some real physical transformations like Saif Ali Khan in Omkara(yellowed his teeth, buzzed his hair, etc), Abhishek Bachchan in Guru (gained 30 lbs to age himself), Aamir Khan in Mangal Panday (grew out his hair and moustache), etc.

  5. This reminds me of when 'Space Seed' first appeared on the original Star Trek series back in the 1960s.

    We had heard that a Sikh was going to be on the show and were quite excited. In those days, minorities on TV were rare, Star Trek being an exception. We were a bit annoyed at the 'Sikh' who was bare-headed, bare-faced, a Latino and a villain, but we thought at least it was a start.

    A start that, at least in North America, fizzled.

    Sikhs on TV here are still very rare and, except on CBC's fictionalised drama of that bombed Air India flight, I can't recall Sikhs ever playing Sikhs. A real shame; I have always thought that visible Sikhs, men and women, have a certain bright attractiveness that would come across well on the screen.

  6. This reminds me of when ‘Space Seed’ first appeared on the original Star Trek series back in the 1960s.

    We had heard that a Sikh was going to be on the show and were quite excited. In those days, minorities on TV were rare, Star Trek being an exception. We were a bit annoyed at the ‘Sikh’ who was bare-headed, bare-faced, a Latino and a villain, but we thought at least it was a start.

    A start that, at least in North America, fizzled.

    Sikhs on TV here are still very rare and, except on CBC’s fictionalised drama of that bombed Air India flight, I can’t recall Sikhs ever playing Sikhs. A real shame; I have always thought that visible Sikhs, men and women, have a certain bright attractiveness that would come across well on the screen.

  7. N says:

    Does anyone else think that donning a turban if you're a non-Sikh is pretty much equivalent to white actors doing a blackface routine? The African American community finds that offensive, and I'm sort of wondering why we think it's okay for our community to be maligned in the same way.

    After all, for those Sikhs who wear turbans, it's a gift from the Guru – something that reminds them of their direct connection to God. So what does it mean when a Salman or a Saif use it for a role-play?

    I think we're adopting a bit of a "beggars can't be choosers" approach when it comes to Bollywood stars wearing turbans. They can be nice and respectful about it, but at the end of the day, they're still not Sikh.

  8. N says:

    Does anyone else think that donning a turban if you’re a non-Sikh is pretty much equivalent to white actors doing a blackface routine? The African American community finds that offensive, and I’m sort of wondering why we think it’s okay for our community to be maligned in the same way.

    After all, for those Sikhs who wear turbans, it’s a gift from the Guru – something that reminds them of their direct connection to God. So what does it mean when a Salman or a Saif use it for a role-play?

    I think we’re adopting a bit of a “beggars can’t be choosers” approach when it comes to Bollywood stars wearing turbans. They can be nice and respectful about it, but at the end of the day, they’re still not Sikh.

  9. whatsinaname says:

    mixed views…

    it's a bit odd that people who don't adhere to sikh principles don the dastar but then there are sikhs who don't follow sikh principles and don the dastar too.

    regardless, whilst it's publicity for sikhs… they're not real sikhs. Personally I'd like to see real sikhs representing sikhs. Like aluwallia.

    just personal views

  10. whatsinaname says:

    mixed views…

    it’s a bit odd that people who don’t adhere to sikh principles don the dastar but then there are sikhs who don’t follow sikh principles and don the dastar too.

    regardless, whilst it’s publicity for sikhs… they’re not real sikhs. Personally I’d like to see real sikhs representing sikhs. Like aluwallia.

    just personal views

  11. saihaj says:

    N, you make a good point. If we are going to be offended by that then we should also be offended when young Sikh men wear turbans simply for the Anand Karaj portion of their wedding and follow it with taking off their turban and shaving their beards for the reception. We can't judge these actors if we have our own issues within the community to fix.

  12. saihaj says:

    N, you make a good point. If we are going to be offended by that then we should also be offended when young Sikh men wear turbans simply for the Anand Karaj portion of their wedding and follow it with taking off their turban and shaving their beards for the reception. We can’t judge these actors if we have our own issues within the community to fix.

  13. This has clarified a few things in my mind.

    Yes, this is very much like actors in blackface or like Caucasians in the 30s playing Mr. Moto and Charlie Chan.

    We should, I think be offended by such things as the young man who grows his beard for his Anand Karaj, then shaves. The blunt word for that is hypocrisy. We should also be offended – and trying to solve – the other major problems within the community, such as drug addiction and alcoholism, domestic violence and female foeticide, gang activity, oh, yes, and what about that 13 year old who supposedly drew his kirpan on his classmates in Montreal. All these problems are real, contradict the teachings of Sikhi and need to be addressed.

    These problems are not just Sikh, of course, but societal. They won't be solved for a long, long time.

    In the meantime, we have the right and obligation to insist that we be treated with respect, both as individuals and as a group.

  14. This has clarified a few things in my mind.

    Yes, this is very much like actors in blackface or like Caucasians in the 30s playing Mr. Moto and Charlie Chan.

    We should, I think be offended by such things as the young man who grows his beard for his Anand Karaj, then shaves. The blunt word for that is hypocrisy. We should also be offended – and trying to solve – the other major problems within the community, such as drug addiction and alcoholism, domestic violence and female foeticide, gang activity, oh, yes, and what about that 13 year old who supposedly drew his kirpan on his classmates in Montreal. All these problems are real, contradict the teachings of Sikhi and need to be addressed.

    These problems are not just Sikh, of course, but societal. They won’t be solved for a long, long time.

    In the meantime, we have the right and obligation to insist that we be treated with respect, both as individuals and as a group.

  15. kuldipsinghmann says:

    At last India is beginning to wake up to realize that Sikhs are also equal or better yet respecting human being. Where ever in the world Sikhs have been sent on U.N. peace keeping mission they are loved by the local people as much as the Americans are hated.I will let you all think as to why?

    The problems India faces in Kashmir are their own making.Just as much family members tend to make.

    I wonder how many people know in the world that Kashmir was never a part of India. Kashmir was a province of Afghanistan. But when Maharaja Ranjit Singh took over great portion of Afghanistan .Kashmir was annexed and made part of Punjab but a separate state for to be ruled by a general like Hari Singh Nalwa.

    Today the very Sikhs who won the land of Kashmir are not allowed to even buy land there.Why we need not know.It is another one of those Hindu government policy not to let the Sikhs advance.

    All that mess they have will never had happened only if India had allowed the Sikhs to be able to settle in Kashmir.It is not so late even today.Let the Sikhs have the right to buy the land in Kashmir as they may wish where they desire with own money.Let them have weapons to protect the state from infiltration .Give the Sikhs land along the border with Pakistan and the freedom to amalgamate the part of Kashmir under Pakistan.Then see the results and peace will prevail .Kashmir will become a secular Indian state once again.Only the Sikhs know how to get along and respect the Muslims and fight when they have to with Talibans and mujahideens.

    Sikhs have the God given ability to solve the problem to stop daily blood bath,to make the state a wealthy and its citizen in doing so become better of them self.But is the rest of India willing to accept the reality. It is no different will not give her own but let the enemy plunder.

    Then I would say look at the history when have the Sikhs have ever back down or lost when ever equal freedom was given with equal weapons in the world. The world respects the Sikhs more then India.

    Just look at what they have achieved in every nation that has accepted them. The British and Canadian wants to have as many Sikhs in the forces as they can. Yet the country they have kept safe from Pakistan /China does not allow them to join the forces more then 2%.Except when the war takes place and they can not win the battle.Now India speaks find some Sikhs to save the honor of India.

  16. kuldipsinghmann says:

    At last India is beginning to wake up to realize that Sikhs are also equal or better yet respecting human being. Where ever in the world Sikhs have been sent on U.N. peace keeping mission they are loved by the local people as much as the Americans are hated.I will let you all think as to why?
    The problems India faces in Kashmir are their own making.Just as much family members tend to make.
    I wonder how many people know in the world that Kashmir was never a part of India. Kashmir was a province of Afghanistan. But when Maharaja Ranjit Singh took over great portion of Afghanistan .Kashmir was annexed and made part of Punjab but a separate state for to be ruled by a general like Hari Singh Nalwa.
    Today the very Sikhs who won the land of Kashmir are not allowed to even buy land there.Why we need not know.It is another one of those Hindu government policy not to let the Sikhs advance.
    All that mess they have will never had happened only if India had allowed the Sikhs to be able to settle in Kashmir.It is not so late even today.Let the Sikhs have the right to buy the land in Kashmir as they may wish where they desire with own money.Let them have weapons to protect the state from infiltration .Give the Sikhs land along the border with Pakistan and the freedom to amalgamate the part of Kashmir under Pakistan.Then see the results and peace will prevail .Kashmir will become a secular Indian state once again.Only the Sikhs know how to get along and respect the Muslims and fight when they have to with Talibans and mujahideens.
    Sikhs have the God given ability to solve the problem to stop daily blood bath,to make the state a wealthy and its citizen in doing so become better of them self.But is the rest of India willing to accept the reality. It is no different will not give her own but let the enemy plunder.
    Then I would say look at the history when have the Sikhs have ever back down or lost when ever equal freedom was given with equal weapons in the world. The world respects the Sikhs more then India.
    Just look at what they have achieved in every nation that has accepted them. The British and Canadian wants to have as many Sikhs in the forces as they can. Yet the country they have kept safe from Pakistan /China does not allow them to join the forces more then 2%.Except when the war takes place and they can not win the battle.Now India speaks find some Sikhs to save the honor of India.

  17. annie says:

    So many of these comments reak of prejudice and intolerance, its very sad to see. If you don't like a non-sikh person playing a sikh in a 'make-believe feature film' then don't watch it! So its alright for Kabir Bedi (A Sikh) to play a Hindu Character, or for that matter a 'Sikh' actor like one of my favourites, Sunny Deol to play a Hindu Character! That is ludicrous! Its just a film, its trying to relay a message – nothing more nothing less. Grow up people! There are people, who wear the turban, and everything else, but their character the way they treat people, what they do are the total opposite of what sikhism preaches, and for that matter its there in every religion – there are bad and good people in every religion. It is so nasty and demeaning to feel negatively about a person who is a non-sikh to play a sikh, i mean does the fact that they are not sikh make them a lesser human being! Thats disgusting and shows how small-minded you are.

  18. whatsinaname says:

    Annie you make a valid point. I'd still like to see sikhs representing themselves in this sort of media though. It's so uncommon. Why?

    Singh is King was meant to represent how 'cool' sikhs are… I have to say I don't think I've seen a film which makes them look as uncool as this.

    I can only speak for the Sikh guys I know but most of them are smart and intelligent beyond many non sikhs and they prefer not to be labelled as jokers / villiage idiots.

    I don't know what salmans dipiction will be. I hope it's better than akshay kumars.

  19. annie says:

    So many of these comments reak of prejudice and intolerance, its very sad to see. If you don’t like a non-sikh person playing a sikh in a ‘make-believe feature film’ then don’t watch it! So its alright for Kabir Bedi (A Sikh) to play a Hindu Character, or for that matter a ‘Sikh’ actor like one of my favourites, Sunny Deol to play a Hindu Character! That is ludicrous! Its just a film, its trying to relay a message – nothing more nothing less. Grow up people! There are people, who wear the turban, and everything else, but their character the way they treat people, what they do are the total opposite of what sikhism preaches, and for that matter its there in every religion – there are bad and good people in every religion. It is so nasty and demeaning to feel negatively about a person who is a non-sikh to play a sikh, i mean does the fact that they are not sikh make them a lesser human being! Thats disgusting and shows how small-minded you are.

  20. whatsinaname says:

    Annie you make a valid point. I’d still like to see sikhs representing themselves in this sort of media though. It’s so uncommon. Why?

    Singh is King was meant to represent how ‘cool’ sikhs are… I have to say I don’t think I’ve seen a film which makes them look as uncool as this.

    I can only speak for the Sikh guys I know but most of them are smart and intelligent beyond many non sikhs and they prefer not to be labelled as jokers / villiage idiots.

    I don’t know what salmans dipiction will be. I hope it’s better than akshay kumars.

  21. Annie you are misunderstanding the meaning of this discussion. If you were a practicing Sikh you would realize that our identity (no matter who embodies it) is sacred to us. The turban and FULLY uncut hair is an identity that reminds us of our beloved Gurus and reminds us of God, because it is the natural form that God created humanity (with hair). Anybody, Sikh or not, who uses our identity to promote something that does not align with our values, we will find offensive at the most, and distasteful at the least. Just about every saint and sage that has graced this earth from Buddha to Jesus to Guru Nanak, etc. has mainted the God given image of man (i.e. with long hair upon the scalp and for men a beard on their face). Just think of the saints and sages of your religion and imagine if their image was used by people who followed the opposite of what they stood for. Wouldn't that offend you? In that case Sikhs would stand with you instead of calling you intolerant and small-minded. There are many Sikhs in the world, if they want a Sikh character, what's the problem with finding a Sikh actor?

    If they were making the life story of Annie wouldn't you prefer they at least ask you something about yourself and your beliefs before representing you in a way that offends you?

  22. Annie you are misunderstanding the meaning of this discussion. If you were a practicing Sikh you would realize that our identity (no matter who embodies it) is sacred to us. The turban and FULLY uncut hair is an identity that reminds us of our beloved Gurus and reminds us of God, because it is the natural form that God created humanity (with hair). Anybody, Sikh or not, who uses our identity to promote something that does not align with our values, we will find offensive at the most, and distasteful at the least. Just about every saint and sage that has graced this earth from Buddha to Jesus to Guru Nanak, etc. has mainted the God given image of man (i.e. with long hair upon the scalp and for men a beard on their face). Just think of the saints and sages of your religion and imagine if their image was used by people who followed the opposite of what they stood for. Wouldn’t that offend you? In that case Sikhs would stand with you instead of calling you intolerant and small-minded. There are many Sikhs in the world, if they want a Sikh character, what’s the problem with finding a Sikh actor?
    If they were making the life story of Annie wouldn’t you prefer they at least ask you something about yourself and your beliefs before representing you in a way that offends you?

  23. p.s. I watched the beginning few scenes of "Singh is Kinng" and it was pretty bad. None of the Sikhs looked like Sikhs with either fake or trimmed beards. They were all portrayed as drinking thugs. The next scene it was the classic village idiot Sikh. Then there was a song and dance at a wedding where a guy with cut hair was dancing around with a full length kirpan, using it like a cane, and then he tossed it away. I thought that was pretty bad. I'm sure it wasn't a real shaster, but still it looked like a real kirpan. First of all to treat any shaster (weapon) in that manner and secondly to treat the bringer of grace (kirpan) which is also a sacred symbol to us, in that way, it was just very low primitive thinking and behavior. I'm sure if I finished the movie I'd see thousands of other ways in which they could possibly disrespect what's sacred to us, but I didn't feel like it.

    I'm not mortally offended by all of it, because I've seen so-called Sikhs behave in the lowest of ways, but I can't say I'm entertained by it or appreciate it in any manner.

  24. rocco says:

    I too have mixed feelings of the whole turbanization of Bollywood. Prabhu Singh makes some wonderful points regarding our identity it's beauty.

    After years of being on the fringe of Indian society, Sikh are now mainstream, front &center, and Bollywood wants to embrace them for one simple reason, $$$$$.Let's be frank, Bollywood is not interested in promoting Sikh values or any kind of wholesome values.

    Fact is Bollywood movies as a whole are pretty horrible and over 90% "flop"(don't recoup there investment.) Alot of these movies are made not for indigenous Indians but for the NRI/NRP (non-residential Indian/Panjabi) market where they can make dollars/pounds rather than rupees. There are several hundred thousand Sikhs in the UK and Canada. The overseas market accounts for a large percentage of a film's gross, thus Bollywood sees "creating Sikh characters" as a good money proposition.

  25. rocco says:

    I too have mixed feelings of the whole turbanization of Bollywood. Prabhu Singh makes some wonderful points regarding our identity it’s beauty.

    After years of being on the fringe of Indian society, Sikh are now mainstream, front &center, and Bollywood wants to embrace them for one simple reason, $$$$$.Let’s be frank, Bollywood is not interested in promoting Sikh values or any kind of wholesome values.

    Fact is Bollywood movies as a whole are pretty horrible and over 90% “flop”(don’t recoup there investment.) Alot of these movies are made not for indigenous Indians but for the NRI/NRP (non-residential Indian/Panjabi) market where they can make dollars/pounds rather than rupees. There are several hundred thousand Sikhs in the UK and Canada. The overseas market accounts for a large percentage of a film’s gross, thus Bollywood sees “creating Sikh characters” as a good money proposition.

  26. p.s. I watched the beginning few scenes of “Singh is Kinng” and it was pretty bad. None of the Sikhs looked like Sikhs with either fake or trimmed beards. They were all portrayed as drinking thugs. The next scene it was the classic village idiot Sikh. Then there was a song and dance at a wedding where a guy with cut hair was dancing around with a full length kirpan, using it like a cane, and then he tossed it away. I thought that was pretty bad. I’m sure it wasn’t a real shaster, but still it looked like a real kirpan. First of all to treat any shaster (weapon) in that manner and secondly to treat the bringer of grace (kirpan) which is also a sacred symbol to us, in that way, it was just very low primitive thinking and behavior. I’m sure if I finished the movie I’d see thousands of other ways in which they could possibly disrespect what’s sacred to us, but I didn’t feel like it.
    I’m not mortally offended by all of it, because I’ve seen so-called Sikhs behave in the lowest of ways, but I can’t say I’m entertained by it or appreciate it in any manner.

  27. baingandabhartha says:

    I have no problem with a non-Sikh playing a Sikh-this IS theatre after all. Having said that, Singh is King is an asinine movie, the Sikh characters are still over the top, 'loveable buffoons'. Akshay's pagri is turned into a topi for most part. What did people expect though? That bollywood was suddenly going to treat ANY (not just Sikhs) one with an iota of accuracy or respect? They stereotype everyone. What irks me more is that people who are making these movies have close friends who are Sikh and they don't observe them closely or do any real research?

    Realize though that bollywood is under no obligation to present the 'ideal' Sikh. They are presenting a lot of what they see around them.

  28. baingandabhartha says:

    I have no problem with a non-Sikh playing a Sikh-this IS theatre after all. Having said that, Singh is King is an asinine movie, the Sikh characters are still over the top, ‘loveable buffoons’. Akshay’s pagri is turned into a topi for most part. What did people expect though? That bollywood was suddenly going to treat ANY (not just Sikhs) one with an iota of accuracy or respect? They stereotype everyone. What irks me more is that people who are making these movies have close friends who are Sikh and they don’t observe them closely or do any real research?

    Realize though that bollywood is under no obligation to present the ‘ideal’ Sikh. They are presenting a lot of what they see around them.

  29. Singh1 says:

    Bollywood and the whole South Asian celebrity / drama / television industry is, for the most part, a box of wild buffoons. They have no business in any Sikh's life. Any Sikh who gives attention to them is wasting his/her time and setting him/herself up for disappointment. Our community is acting like fools, sheeps, slaves for even paying attention to Bollywood at all. The Khalsa is at a much, much higher level than this lame industry, and I am surprised to see so many posts on the Langar Hall about Bollywood.

  30. Singh1 says:

    Bollywood and the whole South Asian celebrity / drama / television industry is, for the most part, a box of wild buffoons. They have no business in any Sikh’s life. Any Sikh who gives attention to them is wasting his/her time and setting him/herself up for disappointment. Our community is acting like fools, sheeps, slaves for even paying attention to Bollywood at all. The Khalsa is at a much, much higher level than this lame industry, and I am surprised to see so many posts on the Langar Hall about Bollywood.

  31. Singh says:

    Singh1 –

    I hate to break it to you, but when a Sikh is portrayed in any media – people other than Sikhs also see it. That being said, if we choose to ignore misrepresentations then we are partly to blame for allowing ignorance to flourish.

    Just for the record – I posted about this because I thought it was cool that, regardless of motive (money), an actor in Bollywood realized that smoking is un-Sikh-like and went so far as to voluntarily give up his freedom in observance of that.

    p.s. Prabhu Singh – well said sir :)

  32. Singh says:

    Singh1 –

    I hate to break it to you, but when a Sikh is portrayed in any media – people other than Sikhs also see it. That being said, if we choose to ignore misrepresentations then we are partly to blame for allowing ignorance to flourish.

    Just for the record – I posted about this because I thought it was cool that, regardless of motive (money), an actor in Bollywood realized that smoking is un-Sikh-like and went so far as to voluntarily give up his freedom in observance of that.

    p.s. Prabhu Singh – well said sir :)

  33. FYI says:

    Annie, Sunny Deol is not a Sikh he is a Arya Samaj Hindu… just check out any interview of Sunny and Bobby Deol, both say they are Hindus. Their father Dharmendra converted to Islam so he could have two wive. So lets not claim the Deols as any kind of Sikh.

  34. FYI says:

    Annie, Sunny Deol is not a Sikh he is a Arya Samaj Hindu… just check out any interview of Sunny and Bobby Deol, both say they are Hindus. Their father Dharmendra converted to Islam so he could have two wive. So lets not claim the Deols as any kind of Sikh.

  35. Bal says:

    However there is definitely some concern with the way the dastar/turban has been used in Bollywood as of late. It seems that the turban has become a fad in the film industry.

    If Bollywood does not portray Sikhs at all, people complain, "Why does Bollywood ignore Sikhs". When they finally start portraying Sikhs in positive roles, some people complain as well. It seems that some Sikhs never stop complaining.

  36. Bal says:

    However there is definitely some concern with the way the dastar/turban has been used in Bollywood as of late. It seems that the turban has become a fad in the film industry.

    If Bollywood does not portray Sikhs at all, people complain, “Why does Bollywood ignore Sikhs”. When they finally start portraying Sikhs in positive roles, some people complain as well. It seems that some Sikhs never stop complaining.

  37. "When they finally start portraying Sikhs in positive roles, some people complain as well."

    When did this happen? Because all I've seen from Bollywood is that Sikhs are either macho gangsters or village idiots?

  38. “When they finally start portraying Sikhs in positive roles, some people complain as well.”

    When did this happen? Because all I’ve seen from Bollywood is that Sikhs are either macho gangsters or village idiots?

  39. […] agree that the Sikh portrayal in Bollywood is far from perfect. But, you have to admit, for making up only 2% of Indias population, weve […]

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