Another Sikh Wedding Act?

Too often in the diaspora, Sikhs are discouraged from becoming involved with the politics of their homeland. While on certain occasions I have been critical of special ‘entitlements‘ and malicious effects the diaspora has had on the Punjabi homeland, sometimes ourwed46.jpg political workings can bring about great effects.

In an earlier post, I had mentioned what I believed to be the Top 5 Sikh Successes of 2007. At #2 I mentioned the Pakistani Sikh Anand Marriage Act. This certainly has been a long demand from the community. In fact it was due to the nullification of the Anand Marriage Act of 1909 and the lumping of Sikhs as “Hindus” in the Indian Constitution that Sikh representatives refused to ratify the constitution.

Sant Jarnail Singh Bhindranwale often reminded Sikhs that if they believe they have an independent status within the Indian state, look no further than their marriage certificate that is signed under the Hindu Marriage Act and compare that to the separate status of the Muslim and Christian communities. The efforts of the Pakistan Sikh Gurdwara Prabandhak Committee and the American Gurdwara Parbhandak Committee led to the announcement last year that Pakistan will recognize and enact legislation recognizing the Anand Marriage Act.

It seems that this political pressure may mark dividends for Sikhs in Punjab. This week, the Indian Law and Justice Minister HR Bhardwaj stated that the government of India is planning to bring in a special marriage act for the Sikhs.

He said the Government has taken note of demands in this regard from various Sikh organisations and “there should not be a problem” in introducing such an act.

“We will bring it soon,” he said replying to supplementaries.

Reality? An empty promise? We’ll find out soon….


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11 Responses to “Another Sikh Wedding Act?”

  1. oopsIforgotmyname says:

    "Too often in the diasporic Sikhs are discouraged from becoming involved with the politics of their homeland"

    why?

    I know you speak of the negativity that the diaspora take back to the 'homeland' but will we ever be accepted as belonging to that homeland? (this isn't a criticism of your comment – I'm too tired to be cheeky this morning – it's a genuine question)

    Interesting post. I'd never even thought about the certification of births deaths and marriages in India.

  2. oopsIforgotmyname says:

    “Too often in the diasporic Sikhs are discouraged from becoming involved with the politics of their homeland”

    why?

    I know you speak of the negativity that the diaspora take back to the ‘homeland’ but will we ever be accepted as belonging to that homeland? (this isn’t a criticism of your comment – I’m too tired to be cheeky this morning – it’s a genuine question)

    Interesting post. I’d never even thought about the certification of births deaths and marriages in India.

  3. Harpreet Singh says:

    well u r write we Sikhs are not hindus and indian goverment have to think that Sikh community has there own traditional and ther own way of living so why to consoder as hindus i am proud to say i am sikh so sikh have there different act as consider by sai ntjarnail singh bhindrawale waheguru ji ka khalsa waheguru jee ke fateh.

  4. Harpreet Singh says:

    well u r write we Sikhs are not hindus and indian goverment have to think that Sikh community has there own traditional and ther own way of living so why to consoder as hindus i am proud to say i am sikh so sikh have there different act as consider by sai ntjarnail singh bhindrawale waheguru ji ka khalsa waheguru jee ke fateh.

  5. […] Anand MarriageAct has been discussed a few times on The Langar Hall. Years ago, I thought of the passage of the new act in Pakistan was one of the […]

  6. I like your article "Another Sikh Wedding Act" and your detail about the Anand Marriage Act is also good. I like that you take interest in it to provide their rights in India.

  7. Romas says:

    A great place to hold a small wedding or event is at the Little Cataraqui Creek Conservation Area Outdoor Centre. Its unique, natural setting and great views make for a memorable day.

  8. The Langar Hall is beautiful hall that held in the India. Many People are assembles weddings on this hall because this is very beautiful and attractive too. Mostly Sikh assembles wedding on this hall and meet with their family members.

  9. Ingrid says:

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